Academics
Departments & Curriculum
Course Description Guide 2024-25

IB / AP (2024-25)

The INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME (IB DP) is a two-year, intellectually challenging curriculum with an international perspective for students in grades 11 and 12. The IB diploma candidate takes six IB tests in the following subject areas: English Literature, Social Studies, World Language, Mathematics, Science, and an elective. In addition, each student writes a 4,000-word research essay and fulfills an extra-curricular and community service requirement. A valuable component of the program is a course called Theory of Knowledge, which teaches how knowledge is acquired and validated.

Academic Expectations: Students are expected to maintain at least a C average at the end of the first semester in SL courses and at the end of the first year of HL courses.

Exam Expectations: Students enrolled in IB courses are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking an IB exam.

Additional Note about IB Science SL Exam Decisions:  Students in an IB Science SL course in grade 11 who plan to continue HL in grade 12 are encouraged to take the IB SL exam for formative assessment and for a contingency plan. If a student is unable to take the IB SL exam due to IB requirements or special circumstances, the student will take a mock IB SL exam before the end of the school year. If the student does not continue with HL in grade 12, the mock exam will contribute 25% of the student’s second-semester grade in the SL subject.

Additional Note about IB Spanish B SL, IB French B SL, or IB Latin SL Exam Decision: Students in an IB Language SL course in grade 11 who do not plan to take the HL course in their senior year are required to complete a virtual component of the course outside of class that will total 28 hours throughout the year. These students are also expected to take the IB exam.  A fee applies to all students taking the exam. The decision to complete the virtual component of the course must be made prior to October 1.



ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) denotes courses that are part of the curriculum of the College Entrance Examination Board. They are designed to allow students to do college-level work in high school. To be admitted to AP courses, the student must meet prerequisites.

Academic Expectations:  Students are expected to maintain at least a C average at the end of the first semester.

Exam Expectations:  Students are expected to take the AP exam at the end of the year. A fee applies to all students taking an AP exam.
 
For additional academic information regarding grading scales, exams, progress reports, etc., please consult the Student-Parent Handbook (login will be sent to new students in Mid-August).

IB and AP English

List of 3 items.

  • IB English A: Literature - Grade 11

    Grade 11
    1 Credit

    Prerequisites: Average grade of B+ or higher on major writing assignments in English 10 Honors and teacher recommendation or average grade of A or higher on major writing assignments in English and teacher recommendation

    Additional Fee:  IB examination fees will be incurred in the second year of the course.

    IB English A: Literature is the first part of the two-year IB English A: Literature HL course. Students will study a range of texts from different periods, styles, and genres while developing the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of individual texts. Students learn to read and write analytically through Socratic classroom discussion and written models focusing on formal, expository projects. The class is a requirement for students pursuing the IB diploma but is open to advanced English students who are curious readers and developing critical writers.

    Units of Study
    Reading Analytically – New Criticism and Post-colonialism
    Writing Analytically - Body Paragraphs/Full Papers
    Non-fiction Read / Write - Comparison Body Paragraphs & Practice HL Essay 1
    Read / Write Contemporary Fiction - Practice HL Essay 2
    IB Syllabus HL Essay Authors - Read/Write/Close Study
    Works in Translation – Group Presentations
    Works in Translation – Close Study/Read/Write
  • IB English A: Literature HL - Grade 12

    Grade 12
    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB English A: Literature

    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam.  A fee applies to all students taking this exam.

    This course is the second year of the two-year IB English A: Literature HL course. This course explores the human condition and the writer's craft through detailed study of a variety of literary genres. The course prepares students for the IB Language A: Literature HL Individual Oral and spring written examinations.

    As we study how writers explore the world and humanity, we learn more about others and ourselves. In the first semester, which focuses on Time and Space and Intertextuality (two of the program's three Areas of Exploration), students will take a deep dive into the work of several writers and genres, including works in translation. Throughout these studies, students will research the historical and cultural context of each work, perform close readings of brief passages, analyze the effects of the writers’ choices, and develop oral and written commentaries that combine close reading, contextual understanding, and knowledge of literary devices. Each semester will provide opportunities for students to practice and improve their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills through a variety of formative and summative assessments, and the first semester will focus primarily on delivering well-composed impromptu remarks. In the second semester of the course, which focuses on Intertextuality and "Readers, Writers, and Texts" (the third Area of Exploration), students will study and compare the work of dramatists, prose writers, and poets. Students will learn through a mixture of close reading and annotation, class discussion, informal writing, performance-based approaches to analyses, and mentor text study. Success in the course depends on students’ willingness to collaborate, read deeply, and devote time and consideration to their writing. Students must be open-minded, curious, respectful of all classmates, and able to work independently.

    Units of Study
    Analyzing Rhetoric and Investigating the Impact of Historical and Cultural Context
    Analyzing Fiction/Drama and the Craft of the Writer
    Analyzing and Interpreting Poetry
    Preparing for the Individual Oral (IO) 
    Intertextuality: Past and Present- Comparing Classic and Contemporary Works
    Preparing for Paper 1 and Paper 2 Exams
  • AP Language and Composition - Grade 12

    Grade 12
    1 credit

    Prerequisites: English 11 Honors or grade of A- in English 11 and teacher recommendation

    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam.  A fee applies to all students taking this exam.

    AP Language and Composition is a reading and writing-intensive course that focuses on the art of rhetoric. Students will learn to write logically and persuasively for a variety of purposes, read and analyze a broad and challenging range of nonfiction texts, and deepen their awareness of the writer’s purpose and how language works. Major projects include researching world leaders and their famous speeches, analyzing the patterns of individual writers’ various works, reading current opinion pieces, and crafting logical responses to them. Students should be skilled at critical reading and writing, as the course requires daily close reading and responses. The course is an excellent introduction to required college composition courses for college freshmen. All students are expected to complete a senior project in the first semester and take the AP Language and Composition exam in the spring.

    Units of Study
    The Rhetorical Situation
    Rhetorical Analysis
    Argument and Synthesis
    The Senior Project
    Current Non-Fiction
    AP Test Review

IB and AP Social Studies

List of 9 items.

  • AP United States History - Grade 10

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: World History Honors (A- or higher) and English RWW 9 (B+ or higher) or World History (A or higher) and English RWW 9 (A- or higher)

    Additional Fee: Students enrolled in this course are expected to take the AP exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam.

    Advanced Placement United States History is a thorough and rigorous survey course organized by basic themes and time periods in order to introduce students to key ideas, events, and people that influenced the course of our nation’s history. The course seeks to apprentice students to the practice of history by explicitly stressing the development of a specific set of historical thinking skills while learning about the past. The seven basic themes are American identity; work, exchange, and technology; geography and the environment; migration; politics and power; America in the world; culture; and society. The eight time periods encompass AD 1492-Present. The College Board has identified six key skills for AP students to develop in their study of American History. Students will learn how to identify and explain historical developments and processes (AP SKILL: Developments and Processes), how to analyze the sourcing and situation of primary and secondary sources (AP SKILL: Sourcing and Situation), how to analyze arguments in primary and secondary sources (AP SKILL: Claims and Evidence in Sources), how to analyze the context of historical events, developments, or processes. (AP SKILL: Contextualization), how to use historical reasoning processes (comparison, causation, continuity, and change) to analyze patterns and connections between and among historical developments and processes (AP SKILL: Making Connections), and how to develop evidence-based arguments (AP SKILL: Argumentation). Students develop these skills through a structured, guided, and open inquiry-based approach to the exploration and interpretation of a rich array of primary and secondary sources and through the regular development of historical argumentation in writing. Skills-based assessment activities also include simulations, audiovisual aids, group activities, and field trips. As most students’ first Advanced Placement course, attention is also paid to the development of sound study skills reflecting the different ways to study for different types of assessment. Students who are seriously considering pursuit of the IB diploma and/or further advanced placement course study should take this course. Doing well in this course requires a passion for United States history, strong reading comprehension, organization, and analytical writing skills along with the ability to self-advocate and attend tutorial when needed. A summer assignment is to be completed before the return to school in August.

    Units of Study
    Period 1: 1491–1607- Native American Civilizations, European Exploration
    Period 2: 1607–1754- Establishment of Colonies, Transatlantic Exchange
    Period 3: 1754–1800- The American Revolution and Foundation
    Period 4: 1800–1848- America as a Young Nation
    Period 5: 1844–1877- Civil War and Reconstruction
    Period 6: 1865–1898- The Gilded Age
    Period 7: 1890–1945- The United States as a World Power
    Period 8: 1945–1980- The United States as a Superpower
    Period 9: 1980–Present- The Modern United States


  • AP United States Government and Politics - Grade 12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisites: Contemporary World History Honors (B+ or higher) or Contemporary World History (A or higher) and teacher recommendation

    Additional Fee: Students enrolled in this course are expected to take the AP exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam.

    This course fulfills the United States Government graduation requirement.

    AP United States Government and Politics provides a college-level, nonpartisan introduction to key political concepts, ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles, and behaviors that characterize the constitutional system and political culture of the United States. Students will study U.S. foundational documents, Supreme Court decisions, and other texts and visuals to gain an understanding of the relationships and interactions among political institutions, processes, and behaviors. They will also engage in disciplinary practices that require them to read and interpret data, make comparisons and applications, and develop evidence-based arguments. In addition, they will complete a political science research or applied civics project.

    Units of Study
    Foundations of American Democracy
    Interactions Among Branches of Government
    Civil Liberties and Civil Rights
    American Political Ideologies and Beliefs
    Political Participation


  • IB History - Grade 11

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite:  AP United States History (B or higher) or United States History Honors (B+ or higher) or United States History (A or higher) and teacher recommendation

    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams. An additional fee is required for the online support tool Kognity.


    IB History is a two-year course that students complete during their junior and senior years. Over the course of the two years, students will engage in an in-depth study of aspects of 20th-century world history. Our HL extension will be the history of the Americas, including some US history and also the history of Canada, as well as Central and South America.

    During the first year of IB, students will complete the Paper One Rights and Protest case study requirements. The case study will involve an in-depth study of Apartheid in South Africa from 1948-1964 and the U.S. Civil Rights Movement from 1954-1965. 

    We will continue with the theme of Civil Rights and social movements as we move into the IB paper three topics of Civil rights and Social Movements in the Americas post-1945. As part of this IB topic, we will expand our examination of the US Civil Rights Movement in the United States through 1980 with an examination of the Black Panthers, Black Power, and Malcolm X. We will also study the role of governments in civil rights movements throughout the Americas.  This paper includes an examination of Indigenous peoples and civil rights and feminist movements throughout the Americas. We will also examine the Hispanic American movements in the United States as well as youth culture and protests of the 1960s and 1970s from across the Americas. 

    In addition, will examine the World War II era through the lens of the IB Paper 2 topic, Move to Global War, in which we will look at Germany, Italy, and Japan, followed by an examination of the impact of WWII on the Americas.

    This is the first year of a two-year sequence.

    Units of Study
    Rights and Protest
    Civil Rights and Social Movements in the Americas post-1945
    The Cold War in the Americas
    Internal Assessment


  • IB History: Europe HL/US Government - Grade 12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite:  Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB History

    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams. An additional fee is required for the online support tool Kognity.

    This course fulfills the United States Government graduation requirement.

    This is the second year of a 2-year sequence. During year two, we will focus on our HL topics that include the First World War, the interwar years, including foreign and domestic policies. As part of the interwar years topics, we will examine what factors contributed to the failure of democratic institutions in Italy, Germany, and Spain. We will explore the causes and consequences of World War II.  

    During the second semester, we will examine the breakdown of the WWII Grand Alliance and the emergence of the Cold War. This unit will include an examination of the policies of the Soviet Union, the United States, and China. For our additional case study, we will explore the Cuban Missile Crisis, which was the closest we came to a nuclear war.

    You will be conducting an historical inquiry this year. You will work on developing research skills and document analysis skills. 

    Units of Study
    Europe and the First World War
    Inter-war domestic developments in European states (1918–1939)
    Diplomacy in Europe (1919–1945)
    The Cold War: Superpower tensions and rivalries (20th century)
    US Government


  • IB Global Politics - Grade 11

    1 Credit

    Prerequisites:  
    AP United States History (B or higher) or United States History Honors (B+ or higher) and English 10 Honors (B or higher) or English 10 (A or higher) and teacher recommendation

    OR

    United States History (A or higher) and English 10 Honors (B or higher) or English 10 (A or higher) and teacher recommendation


    Additional Fee:  IB examination fees will be incurred in the second year of the course.

    This is the first year of the two-year IB Global Politics HL course. The course explores fundamental political concepts such as power, liberty, and equality, in a range of contexts and at a variety of levels. It allows students to develop an understanding of the local, national, international, and global dimensions of political activity, as well as allowing them the opportunity to explore political issues affecting their own lives. The course helps students to understand abstract political concepts by grounding them in real-world examples and case studies while preparing them for the IB Global Politics exam administered at the conclusion of their senior year. Developing international mindedness and an awareness of multiple perspectives is at the heart of this course. It encourages dialogue and debate, nurturing the capacity to interpret competing and contestable claims. Students will learn through critical readings, class discussions, analytical writing, engagement activities, independent research, and student presentations. The course demands that students go beyond memorizing information and reinforces critical thinking skills such as the ability to interpret, analyze, and apply information.  Students are expected to be self-directed while developing research and problem-solving skills.  It is crucial for students to have an interest in current issues, consider and be respectful of multiple viewpoints, and work independently.

    Units of Study
    Power, Sovereignty and International Relations
    Engagement Activity and Paper
    Human Rights
    Development
    Peace and Conflict
  • IB Global Politics HL / US Government - Grade 12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Global Politics

    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam.  A fee applies to all students taking this exam.

    This course fulfills the United States Government graduation requirement.

    This is the second year of the two-year sequence of Global Politics HL.  The course explores fundamental political concepts such as power, liberty, and equality, in a range of contexts and at a variety of levels. It allows students to develop an understanding of the local, national, international, and global dimensions of political activity, as well as allowing them the opportunity to explore political issues affecting their own lives. The course helps students to understand abstract political concepts by grounding them in real-world examples and case studies while preparing them for the IB Global Politics exam administered at the conclusion of their senior year. Developing international mindedness and an awareness of multiple perspectives is at the heart of this course. It encourages dialogue and debate, nurturing the capacity to interpret competing and contestable claims. Students will learn through critical readings, class discussions, analytical writing, engagement activities, independent research, and student presentations. It is crucial for students to have an interest in current issues, consider and be respectful of multiple viewpoints, and to work independently.  A major portion of the first semester is dedicated to independent case studies that showcase the student's understanding of theories and concepts in global politics through a real-world issue.  This culminates in two 10 minute presentations that are recorded for IB and requires the student to have both strong research and communication skills.  These skills are reinforced throughout the course.  

    This course fulfills the United States Government graduation requirement.  Students will gain an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. 

    Units of Study
    Independent Research and Higher Level Case Study Presentations
    Power, Sovereignty and International Relations
    Human Rights
    Development
    Peace and Conflict


  • IB Geography - Grade 11

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: AP United States History (B or higher) or United States History Honors (B+ or higher) or United States History (A or higher) and teacher recommendation

    Required tools:  Colored pencils

    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams. An additional fee is required for the online support tool Kognity.

    This is the first year of the two-year IB Geography HL course. Geography is a dynamic subject that is firmly grounded in the real world and focuses on the interactions between individuals, societies, and physical processes in both time and space. It seeks to identify trends and patterns in these interactions. It also investigates the way in which people adapt and respond to change, and evaluates actual and possible management strategies associated with such change. Geography describes and helps to explain the similarities and differences between different places. These may be defined on a variety of scales and from the perspectives of a different range of actors, with varying powers over decision-making processes.

    Within individuals and societies subjects, geography is distinctive in its spatial dimension and occupies a middle ground between social or human sciences and natural sciences. The Diploma Programme geography course integrates physical, environmental, and human geography, and ensures that students acquire elements of both socio‑economic and scientific methodologies. Geography takes advantage of its position to examine relevant concepts and ideas from a wide variety of disciplines. This helps students develop life skills and have an appreciation of, and respect for, alternative approaches, viewpoints, and ideas.

    Units of Study
    Changing Population
    Global Climate
    Global Resource Consumption
    Freshwater Drainage Basins
    Oceans and Coastal Margins
    Urban Environments
    Global Interactions


  • IB Geography HL/US Government - Grade 12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite:  Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Geography

    Required tools:  Colored pencils

    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams. An additional fee is required for the online support tool Kognity.

    This course fulfills the United States Government graduation requirement.

    This is the second year of the two-year IB Geography HL course. Geography is a dynamic subject that is firmly grounded in the real world and focuses on the interactions between individuals, societies, and physical processes in both time and space. It seeks to identify trends and patterns in these interactions. It also investigates the way in which people adapt and respond to change, and evaluates actual and possible management strategies associated with such change. Geography describes and helps to explain the similarities and differences between different places. These may be defined on a variety of scales and from the perspectives of a different range of actors, with varying powers over decision-making processes.

    Within individuals and societies subjects, geography is distinctive in its spatial dimension and occupies a middle ground between social or human sciences and natural sciences. The Diploma Programme geography course integrates physical, environmental, and human geography, and ensures that students acquire elements of both socio‑economic and scientific methodologies. Geography takes advantage of its position to examine relevant concepts and ideas from a wide variety of disciplines. This helps students develop life skills and have an appreciation of, and respect for, alternative approaches, viewpoints, and ideas.

    In addition, students will gain an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States during the course. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples.

    Units of Study
    Changing Population
    Global Climate
    Global Resource Consumption
    Freshwater Drainage Basins
    Oceans and Coastal Margins
    Urban Environments
    Power, Places, and Networks
    Human Development and Diversity
    Global Risks and Resilience
  • IB Environmental Systems & Societies SL - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on expectations of B or higher in Chemistry Honors and Biology Honors (or previous IB course) or A in Chemistry and Biology (or previous standard-level science course), evidence of focus, reliability, work ethic, independent learning, and passion for the subject matter.

    Required tools:  Graphing calculator. "Rite-in-the-Rain" Field Journal (purchased through the school)

    Additional Fees: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams. An additional fee is required for the online support tool Kognity.

    This course may count as a Group 3 and/or a Group 4 IB course for diploma candidates.  It will also satisfy either a Trinity science credit or a social studies credit, but not both.

    The intent of this course is to help students develop a holistic perspective on the environment using a systems approach together with scientific, economic, historical, cultural, and socio-political methodologies. The course seeks to help students develop the skills to assess, measure, and analyze the environment from a local to a global perspective. Topics include foundations of environmental systems and societies, ecosystems and ecology, biodiversity and conservation, water and aquatic food production systems and societies, soil systems and terrestrial food production systems and societies, atmospheric systems and societies, climate change and energy production and human systems and resource use.

    In the laboratory component of this course, students will explore experimental methods, develop experimental design skills and apply these methods and skills to the study of ecosystems and societies. Laboratory work will be augmented with fieldwork both on the Trinity property and other locations. Students are expected to independently apply laboratory skills and report writing learned in previous science classes. Advanced skills will be developed throughout the course and students will complete an individual investigation that is assessed by the teacher and submitted to IBO. It represents 25% of the exam score. The investigation focuses on using the scientific method for a lab experience that includes: planning and conducting an experiment; processing, analyzing and graphing data collected from the experiment; discussing and making conclusions using collected data, and evaluating the experimental process itself.

    This course is for any student interested in environmental sciences, sustainability, or the outdoors in general. However, the goal of this course is to explain environmentalism through a variety of lenses, from economic, to religious, to recreational, so all curious and qualified students are welcome. It is a class that does involve some outdoor work, so students should be prepared to work safely in any weather.

    Units of Study
    Foundations of ESS
    Ecosystems and ecology 
    Biodiversity and conservation
    Water, aquatic food production systems, and societies
    Soil systems, terrestrial food production systems and societies
    Atmospheric systems and societies
    Climate change and energy production
    Human systems and resource use


IB and AP Math

List of 3 items.

  • IB Maths: Analysis and Approaches SL - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisites: Students who are full IB diploma candidates and have completed a Pre-Calculus course and teacher recommendation

    Required Tools:  TI-84 Plus Series calculator

    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam.  A fee applies to all students taking this exam. 

    The IB DP Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches SL course caters to students with varied backgrounds and abilities in the IB diploma programme. It offers students opportunities to learn important concepts and techniques and to gain an understanding of a wide variety of mathematical topics, including Calculus. The focus is on developing important mathematical concepts in a comprehensible, coherent, and rigorous way, achieved by a carefully balanced approach. Students are encouraged to apply their mathematical knowledge to solve problems set in a variety of meaningful contexts. A requirement within this course is the project: a written piece of work based on personal research involving the collection, analysis, and evaluation of data. This course prepares the student for the required IB examination. Students who select this course will not be taught the AP Calculus curriculum nor take the AP Calculus exam.

    Units of Study
    Number and Algebra (sequences and series, binomial theorem)
    Functions (linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, rational, transformations)
    Geometry and Trigonometry
    Statistics
    Probability
    Calculus
  • IB Maths: Analysis and Approaches SL/AP Calculus AB - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in Precalculus Honors or IB Maths: Analysis/Pre-Cal Honors. An ability to understand abstract mathematical concepts and a strong work ethic are necessary to be a student in these courses. 
    Required Tools: TI-84 Plus Series calculator

    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the AP and/or the IB exams. A fee applies to all students taking these exams.

    The course closely follows the recommendations of the Committee on Mathematics of the Advanced Placement Program (AB syllabus) as well as covers topics inherent to the IB Mathematics program. This course is designed to help students develop a conceptual understanding of college-level calculus content, as well as proficiency in the skills and practices needed for mathematical reasoning and problem-solving. Skills developed in this class are reasoning with definitions and theorems, connecting concepts, implementing algebraic/computational processes, connecting multiple representations, building notational fluency, and communicating. The pace is rapid and students are expected to read sections of the book when they need additional explanation. Students must be committed to daily work, both in and out of class. The course will have many "no calculator" units. The distinction between this course and standard level Calculus is the pacing and depth at which the content is covered.

    Units of Study
    Limits
    Derivatives
    Applications of Differentiation
    Integration 
    Applications of Integration
    Differential Equations
  • IB Maths: Analysis and Approaches SL/AP Calculus BC - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Maths: Analysis SL/AP Calculus AB, and a B or better in Precalculus Honors

    Required Tools: TI-84 Plus Series calculator

    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the AP and/or the IB exams. A fee applies to all students taking these exams.

    This course is designed to prepare the student for taking the IB Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches SL and AP Calculus BC exams in the spring. Students will be exposed to previous IB and AP exam problems. Students who plan to take the IB Mathematics SL exam must also complete a mathematical exploration, which is a piece of written work that investigates an area of mathematics of their choice. The pace is rapid and students are expected to read sections of the book when they need additional explanation.

    Units of Study
    Differential Calculus
    Integration
    Differential Equations
    Series Convergence
    Polar and Parametric Coordinates
    Functions, Equations, and Binomial Expansion
    Circular Functions and Trigonometry
    Statistics and Probability
    Proofs


IB Science

List of 7 items.

  • IB Environmental Systems & Societies SL - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on expectations of B or higher in Chemistry Honors and Biology Honors (or previous IB course) or A in Chemistry and Biology (or previous standard-level science course), evidence of focus, reliability, work ethic, independent learning, and passion for the subject matter.

    Required tools:  Graphing calculator. "Rite-in-the-Rain" Field Journal (purchased through the school)

    Additional Fees: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams. An additional fee is required for the online support tool Kognity.

    This course may count as a Group 3 and/or a Group 4 IB course for diploma candidates.  It will also satisfy either a Trinity science credit or a social studies credit, but not both.

    The intent of this course is to help students develop a holistic perspective on the environment using a systems approach together with scientific, economic, historical, cultural and socio-political methodologies. The course seeks to help students develop the skills to assess, measure, and analyze the environment from a local to a global perspective. Topics include foundations of environmental systems and societies, ecosystems and ecology, biodiversity and conservation, water and aquatic food production systems and societies, soil systems and terrestrial food production systems and societies, atmospheric systems and societies, climate change, and energy production and human systems and resource use.

    In the laboratory component of this course, students will explore experimental methods, develop experimental design skills and apply these methods and skills to the study of ecosystems and societies. Laboratory work will be augmented with fieldwork both on the Trinity property and other locations. Students are expected to independently apply laboratory skills and report writing learned in previous science classes. Advanced skills will be developed throughout the course and students will complete an individual investigation that is assessed by the teacher and submitted to IBO. It represents 25% of the exam score. The investigation focuses on using the scientific method for a lab experience that includes: planning and conducting an experiment; processing, analyzing, and graphing data collected from the experiment; discussing and making conclusions using collected data; and evaluating the experimental process itself.

    This course is for any student interested in environmental sciences, sustainability, or the outdoors in general. However, the goal of this course is to explain environmentalism through a variety of lenses, from economic, to religious, to recreational, so all curious and qualified students are welcome. It is a class that does involve some outdoor work, so students should be prepared to work safely in any weather.

    Units of Study
    Foundations of ESS
    Ecosystems and ecology 
    Biodiversity and conservation
    Water, aquatic food production systems, and societies
    Soil systems, terrestrial food production systems and societies
    Atmospheric systems and societies
    Climate change and energy production
    Human systems and resource use
  • IB Biology SL - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on expectations of B or higher in Chemistry Honors and Biology Honors (or previous IB course) or A in Chemistry and Biology (or previous standard-level science course), evidence of focus, reliability, work ethic, and independent learning.

    Required tools: A TI 83/84 calculator is recommended for this course. All students should have at least a four-function calculator for the IB exam.

    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams. An additional fee is required for the online support tool Kognity.

    Biologists investigate the living world at all levels from the microscopic to macroscopic, using a variety of approaches and techniques. At one end of the scale are the cell, its molecular construction, and complex metabolic reactions. At the other end of the scale are the ecosystem-level interactions in the biosphere. The IB Biology curriculum is organized around these levels of organization, exploring four main themes that interconnect them all. Students should be able to focus on challenging concepts, maintain a strong work ethic, and be both independent and collaborative learners. Those who are interested in college or career-level biology, ecology, medicine, and health will all benefit from the course. Students will demonstrate their knowledge through a variety of means, apply that knowledge to modern problems, and engage in scientific investigations designed to develop their analysis, research, and evaluation skills. Students are expected to independently apply previous laboratory skills and continue to develop them, culminating with an IA - an individually designed and completed investigation assessed by the teacher. The score on the IA, along with the May exam scores, completes the overall IB Biology grade.

    Units of Study
    Form and Function
    Unity and Diversity
    Interaction and Interdependence
    Continuity and Change.

    These units are explored through four main levels of organization: Molecules, Cells, Organisms, and Ecosystems.
  • IB Biology HL - Grade 12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Biology SL
    Required tools: A TI 83/84 calculator is recommended for this class. All students need at least a four-function calculator for the IB exam.

    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams. Students will be charged a fee for Kognity in this course. Kognity is an online learning support tool.

    This course builds upon what was learned in IB Biology SL. Students re-engage with previous topics and take on additional coursework in cell signaling, viruses, genetics, and movement systems. Students demonstrate their learning through collaborative activities, lab investigations, research projects, and data analysis. To succeed in this course, students must be curious, knowledgeable, attentive to detail, determined, creative, and self-motivated. Skills in critical analysis, observation, research, and writing are all emphasized. Those interested in majors/jobs in biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, chemistry, psychology, nursing/medical school, engineering, agriculture, and ecology should consider taking this course. This course prepares students for the IB Biology HL examination.

    Units of Study
    Form and Function
    Unity and Diversity
    Interaction and Interdependence
    Continuity and Change

    These units are explored through four main levels of organization: Molecules, Cells, Organisms, and Ecosystems.
  • IB Chemistry SL - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation based on expectations of B+ or higher in Chemistry Honors and Biology Honors, (or B or higher in previous IB course), or A in Chemistry and Biology (or previous standard-level science course), evidence of focus, reliability, work ethic, and independent learning.   In addition, the mathematics prerequisite is B or higher in Algebra 2 Honors or A or higher in Algebra 2.

    Required tools:  TI-84 Plus Calculator

    Additional fees: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams. An additional fee is required for the online support tool Kognity.

    This course takes a rigorous approach to academic study and investigational laboratory skills, emphasizing experimental design and documentation. This means students should anticipate a difficult, but rewarding, class. Stoichiometry, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding and intermolecular forces, energetics, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction and electrochemistry, basic organic chemistry, and medicinal chemistry are the major topics that are covered. All students conduct research for the IB Group 4 science project. Assessment includes homework, quizzes, tests, labs, and practice problems from prior IB exams. Independent laboratory work is assessed in the second semester. Students learn concepts and practical applications through lectures, group work, problem-solving, and lab activities. The course also covers laboratory techniques, experimental design, error analysis, and statistical analysis. This course prepares students for the IB Chemistry Standard Level Examination.

    This course is recommended for students who plan to pursue careers in sciences, engineering, medicine, nursing, pharmacology, physical therapy, etc.

    Units of Study
    Structure 1: Models of the particulate nature of matter
    Structure 2: Models of bonding and structure
    Structure 3: Classification of matter
    Reactivity 1: What drives chemical reactions?
    Reactivity 2: How much, how fast, and how far?
    Reactivity 3: What are the mechanisms of chemical change?
  • IB Chemistry HL - Grade 12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Chemistry SL

    Required tools:  TI-84 Plus Calculator

    Additional fees: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams. An additional fee is required for the online support tool Kognity.

    This course covers a review of the material covered in IB Chemistry SL as well as the additional material specified for IB Chemistry HL. This course provides a deeper approach to chemical principles, including the required mathematical analysis. Students must be able to retain material mastered in Chemistry SL as well as the work in the HL course and apply it throughout the entire field of study. Laboratory work is an extensive part of the course with an emphasis on experimental design and report writing. A scientific paper on the student’s self-designed experiment and a cumulative test will take the place of a first-semester exam. Topics covered include atomic structure, chemical bonding and structure, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, redox, acids and bases, and a detailed survey of organic chemistry and instrumental analysis. The IB optional study topic is medicine and drugs. Students who complete this course will be prepared to take the IB Chemistry Higher Level examination.

    This course is recommended for students who plan to pursue careers in sciences, engineering, medicine, nursing, pharmacology, physical therapy, etc.
     
    Units of Study
    Structure 1: Models of the particulate nature of matter
    Structure 2: Models of bonding and structure
    Structure 3: Classification of matter
    Reactivity 1: What drives chemical reactions?
    Reactivity 2: How much, how fast, and how far?
    Reactivity 3: What are the mechanisms of chemical change?
  • IB Physics SL - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation based on expectations of B+ or higher in Chemistry Honors and Biology Honors, (or B or higher in previous IB course), or A in Chemistry and Biology (or previous standard-level science course), evidence of focus, reliability, work ethic, and independent learning.  In addition, the mathematics prerequisite is B or higher in Algebra 2 Honors or A or higher in Algebra 2.

    Required tools:  TI-84 Plus Calculator

    Additional fees: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams. Students will be charged a fee for Kognity in this course. Kognity is an online learning support tool.

    Delve into the captivating realm of physics with the International Baccalaureate (IB) Physics Standard Level (SL) course. Designed to inspire curiosity and foster a deep understanding of the natural world, IB Physics SL offers students a journey through the principles that govern the universe. Students will be exposed to ‘tools’ for understanding physics through mathematics, experimentation, and data analysis.

    Throughout this course, success will come to students who:
    -   embark on a comprehensive exploration of classical mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, waves, quantum physics, and more.
    -   engage in experiments, theoretical investigations, and real-world applications,
    -   develop critical thinking skills and analytical mindsets

    IB Physics SL places a strong emphasis on hands-on experimentation, encouraging students to develop practical skills in data collection, analysis, and interpretation. Students gain proficiency in scientific inquiry, learning to formulate hypotheses, design experiments, and draw evidence-based conclusions.

    Milestones of this course include an individual assessment/lab, Group 4 project, and external assessments. Those who are considering careers in STEM-based fields should strongly consider taking this course.

    IB Physics SL empowers students to become lifelong learners and informed global citizens. Whether pursuing further studies in the sciences, engineering, or beyond, graduates of IB Physics SL emerge with a profound appreciation for the beauty and intricacy of the physical world, ready to make meaningful contributions to society.

    Units of Study
    Space, Time, and Motion
    The Particulate Nature of Matter
    Wave Behavior
    Fields
    Nuclear and Quantum Physics

  • IB Physics HL - Grade 12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite:  Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Physics SL  

    Required tools:  TI-84 Plus Calculator

    Additional fees: Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams. Students will be charged a fee for Kognity in this course. Kognity is an online learning support tool.

    This course uses college-level texts and laboratory experiences and includes a detailed approach to the principles of physics. The course amplifies the material taught in the first year of the course with a greater emphasis on problem-solving skills involving more advanced mathematical methods. Students will learn through independent research, hands-on laboratory investigations, demonstrations, and collaborative work within the class. Students should be able to think critically and work independently. This course prepares students not only for the IB Physics HL Examination but also for advanced physical scientific study at the college level. While reviewing the standard-level material and learning the additional higher-level topics, students will gain an understanding and appreciation for the scientific advances that have contributed to the development of society as we know it. Students should expect a rigorous curriculum. Healthy study habits and time management skills are a necessity for success in this course. Those who are interested in careers in science and engineering should consider taking this course.

    Units of Study
    Space, Time, and Motion
    The Particulate Nature of Matter
    Wave Behavior
    Fields
    Nuclear and Quantum Physics


IB Music

List of 2 items.

  • IB Music - Grade 11

    1 Credit
    Prerequisites:  Satisfactory score on a music skills placement test and teacher permission 

    Required
    Tools:  Instrumentalists must have their own instrument at home with the exception of percussionists, who should have the core instruments (snare and bells) at home but can use the school's percussion inventory to diversify their recital program.

    Additional Fees: Though not a school fee, private music lessons on a student's primary instrument or voice are HIGHLY encouraged to be taken through the senior year PRESENTING recital. IB assessment fees will be incurred in the second year of the course.
    This is the first year of a two-year course that examines music with regard to several distinct functions: music used for worship, sociocultural and/or national/political reasons; music used for dramatic impact to support movement/dance, theater, film, video games, and other media; music developed largely or completely through electronic/technological means; and music with a foremost purpose to be a listening experience. 

    The course helps students develop 3 roles required for comprehensive musicianship: 

    (1) RESEARCHER - Students conduct analyses yielding scholarly written observations about both musical (melody, rhythm, harmony, form...) and extra-musical (time period, societal context/function ...) aspects of works encompassing a wide variety of styles. (Popular, World, Art Music -"Classical", Hybrid works mixing these styles) Students will investigate music with which they are either somewhat or even completely unfamiliar as well as works they know well.
    (2) CREATOR - Students compose, arrange and improvise music using style/genre guidelines. 
    (3) PERFORMER -Students through their voices, instruments, and/or technology bring musical works into sound realizations.

    Students learn by frequent critical listening and analysis of musical works. The findings of their research inform the subsequent Creating and Performing activities.

    This course is a year-long elective for juniors. Students who would like to develop their musical skills to a high level, especially those who are considering a career in any music-related field should take this course. Key skills are the ability to listen critically and express findings from analysis (both in class discussion and in writing) and to work both independently and in collaboration with peers. It is important that students approach all studied music with an open mind and seek to understand both the emotional and intellectual aspects that are present in all well-crafted musical works.

    Students must take private instruction with a qualified instructor on her/his instrument or voice through the senior year PRESENTING recital. Interested students should contact the instructor to arrange for an inventory of musical concepts no later than the end of their freshman year.

    Units of Study
    Areas of Inquiry (AoI) 1-4: how is music created, performed, and used in different settings?
    Context: familiarity and accessibility
    Elements of Music 1: Melody, Rhythm & Harmony
    Aural Dictation
    Elements of Music 2: Texture, Dynamics, Articulations, Timbre
    Structure: Musical Organization
    AoI-based Musical Analysis: extramusical and musical findings, supporting evidence
    Personal Context Work Analysis
    AoI 1: Native American music -associated concepts: pentatonic scales, changing meters, vocables
    Creating Exercise 1-Native American melody
    Performance Adaptation of Native American Melody
    AoI 2: Modal jazz-associated concepts: modes, bass line construction, quartal and tertian chords in piano accompaniment
    Creating Exercise 2-modal jazz tune with jazz quartet
    AoI 1: Music with social message-associated concepts: writing for the public, popular song structure, lyric writing
    Creating Exercise 3-protest song
    AoIs 3/4: Synth film score-associated concepts: structural layering with loops, developing and manipulating melody, rhythm, and timbre with software technology
    Creating Exercise 4-synth film score
    AoIs 1/3: Folk dance music-associated concepts: signature elements (meter/tempo, rhythm patterns, structure); cultural markers
    Creating Exercise 5-folk dance composition, Irish jig, or Cuban danzón
    Performance Adaptation 2
    Personal Context Work Analysis
    AoI 2: Multi-section Writing-associated concepts: thematic repetition and contrast, key changes, sectional transition techniques
    Creating Exercise 6-Vocal or Instrumental Solo w/ accompaniment
  • IB Music HL/SL - Grade 12

    1 Credit
    Prerequisite:  Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Music

    Required
    Tools:  Instrumentalists must have their own instrument at home with the exception of percussionists, who should have the core instruments (snare and bells) at home but can use the school's percussion inventory to diversify their recital program.

    Additional
    Fees:  Though not a school fee, private music lessons on a student's primary instrument or voice must be taken through the senior year PRESENTING recital. Students in this course are expected to complete the IB assessments.  An IB assessment fee applies to all students taking this course.
    This is the final year of a two-year course that examines music with regard to several distinct functions: music used for worship, sociocultural and/or national/political reasons; music used for dramatic impact to support movement/dance, theater, film, video games, and other media; music developed largely or completely through electronic/technological means; and music with a foremost purpose to be a listening experience. 

    Students finish out the EXPLORING phase of their studies early in the year and then move into the EXPERIMENTING stage, in which they further develop researching, creating, and performing work from their choice of prior explorations. As this process moves forward, students then refine different select creations and performances that represent their best work from the totality of the course to submit as the PRESENTING portfolio.  

    Each HL student also plans and collaboratively creates a project, the Contemporary Music Maker, that draws on the competencies, skills, and processes in all of the musical roles of the course, and is inspired by real-life practices of music-making.

    All SL students as a group collaboratively plan, create and perform a single composition for the Fine Arts Festival in May.

    This course is a year-long elective for seniors. Students who would like to develop their musical skills to a very high level, especially those who are considering a career in any music-related field should take this course. Key skills are the ability to listen critically and express findings from analysis (both in class discussion and in writing) and to work both independently and in collaboration with peers. It is important that students approach all studied music with an open mind and seek to understand both the emotional and intellectual aspects that are present in all well-crafted musical works. Students must be forward-looking in their time management; judicious planning for the various submission schedules is of critical importance. 

    Students must take private instruction with a qualified instructor on her/his instrument or voice through the senior year recital portion of the PRESENTING portfolio.

    Units of Study
    Selection, Compilation, and Submission of EXPLORATION Portfolio (Q1)
    Experimenting: Student-selected Analyses, Creations & Performances (Q2)
    Compilation and Submission of EXPERIMENTING Portfolio (Q3)
    Presenting: Written Program Notes and refined Creations & Performances (Q3 & 4)
    Submission of PRESENTING portfolio (Q4)
    *HL Students -The Contemporary Music Maker Project (Q1-4)

IB Visual Arts

List of 7 items.

  • IB Visual Arts - Grade 11

    2D, 3D, or Photography

    Grade 11
    1 Credit

    Prerequisites:  IB Visual Arts is open to juniors who have fulfilled all required pre-IB art electives, who have demonstrated maturity, commitment, and dedication to visual arts, who have written an essay of intent, and who have the permission of the teacher. Pre-IB art electives include: Design Fundamentals and levels 1 and 2 in one medium

    Required Tools:  Sketchbook

    Additional Fee:  IB assessment fees will be incurred in the second year of the course.

    This IB Visual Arts course is the first year of a two-year program for diploma or course candidates. Students accepted into the IB Visual Arts Program will spend 3 quarters rotating between each of the visual arts discipline areas, spending 1 quarter with each of the IB Visual Arts teachers of 2D, 3D, and Photography to create a well-rounded Process Portfolio (1 part of the IB Assessment). The 4th quarter will be spent with the medium and teacher that the student chooses to pursue their medium (2D, 3D, or Photography.)   Additionally, the final quarter provides an introduction to the Comparative Study portion of the IB Assessment.

    Units of Study
    2D Processes
    Photo Processes
    3D Processes
    Introduction to the Comparative Study


  • IB Visual Arts SL 2D - Grade 12

    Grade 12
    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Visual Arts 

    Required Tools:  Sketchbook

    Additional Fee:  Students in this course are expected to complete the IB Assessment. A fee applies to all students taking this course.
     
    This IB Visual Arts course is the second year of a two-year program for diploma or course candidates. This course is designed for the visual arts student with creative and imaginative abilities who may pursue the visual arts at a university or college. Senior Year in IB Visual Arts will entail refinement and completion of the Process Portfolio and Comparative Study. Seniors will also be required to complete a cohesive body of work for the Exhibition portion of the IB Assessment and an accompanying Curatorial Rationale.

    Units of Study
    Comparative Study
    Exhibition:  Planning and Creating
    Curatorial Rationale


  • IB Visual Arts HL 2D - Grade 12

    Grade 12
    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Visual Arts 

    Required Tools:  Sketchbook

    Additional Fee:  Students in this course are expected to complete the IB Assessment. A fee applies to all students taking this course.
     
    This IB Visual Arts course is the second year of a two-year program for diploma or course candidates. This course is designed for the visual arts student with creative and imaginative abilities who may pursue the visual arts at a university or college. Senior Year in IB Visual Arts will entail refinement and completion of the Process Portfolio and Comparative Study. Seniors will also be required to complete a cohesive body of work for the Exhibition portion of the IB Assessment and an accompanying Curatorial Rationale.

    Units of Study
    Comparative Study
    Exhibition:  Planning and Creating
    Curatorial Rationale
  • IB Visual Arts SL 3D - Grade 12

    Grade 12
    1 Credit
    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Visual Arts 
    Required Tools:  Sketchbook
    Additional Fee:  Students in this course are expected to complete the IB Assessment. A fee applies to all students taking this course.
     
    This IB Visual Arts course is the second year of a two-year program for diploma or course candidates. This course is designed for the visual arts student with creative and imaginative abilities who may pursue the visual arts at a university or college. Senior Year in IB Visual Arts will entail refinement and completion of the Process Portfolio and Comparative Study. Seniors will also be required to complete a cohesive body of work for the Exhibition portion of the IB Assessment and an accompanying Curatorial Rationale.

    Units of Study
    Comparative Study
    Exhibition:  Planning and Creating
    Curatorial Rationale
  • IB Visual Arts HL 3D - Grade 12

    Grade 12
    1 Credit
    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Visual Arts 
    Required Tools:  Sketchbook
    Additional Fee:  Students in this course are expected to complete the IB Assessment. A fee applies to all students taking this course.
     
    This IB Visual Arts course is the second year of a two-year program for diploma or course candidates. This course is designed for the visual arts student with creative and imaginative abilities who may pursue the visual arts at a university or college. Senior Year in IB Visual Arts will entail refinement and completion of the Process Portfolio and Comparative Study. Seniors will also be required to complete a cohesive body of work for the Exhibition portion of the IB Assessment and an accompanying Curatorial Rationale.

    Units of Study
    Comparative Study
    Exhibition:  Planning and Creating
    Curatorial Rationale
  • IB Visual Arts SL Photography - Grade 12

    Grade 12
    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Visual Arts 

    Required Tools:  Sketchbook

    Additional Fee:  Students in this course are expected to complete the IB Assessment. A fee applies to all students taking this course.
     
    This IB Visual Arts course is the second year of a two-year program for diploma or course candidates. This course is designed for the visual arts student with creative and imaginative abilities who may pursue the visual arts at a university or college. Senior Year in IB Visual Arts will entail refinement and completion of the Process Portfolio and Comparative Study. Seniors will also be required to complete a cohesive body of work for the Exhibition portion of the IB Assessment and an accompanying Curatorial Rationale.

    Units of Study
    Comparative Study
    Exhibition:  Planning and Creating
    Curatorial Rationale
  • IB Visual Arts HL Photography - Grade 12

    Grade 12
    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Visual Arts 

    Required Tools:  Sketchbook

    Additional Fee:  Students in this course are expected to complete the IB Assessment. A fee applies to all students taking this course.
     
    This IB Visual Arts course is the second year of a two-year program for diploma or course candidates. This course is designed for the visual arts student with creative and imaginative abilities who may pursue the visual arts at a university or college. Senior Year in IB Visual Arts will entail refinement and completion of the Process Portfolio and Comparative Study. Seniors will also be required to complete a cohesive body of work for the Exhibition portion of the IB Assessment and an accompanying Curatorial Rationale.

    Units of Study
    Comparative Study
    Exhibition:  Planning and Creating
    Curatorial Rationale

IB Non-Departmental

List of 8 items.

  • IB CAS 1 - Grade 11

    Grade 11

    Additional fee: IB fees will be incurred during the second year of the CAS experience.

    Creativity, Activity, Service provides students with the chance to participate in a range of experiences alongside their academic studies. The three strands of CAS are creativity (arts, and other experiences that involve creative thinking), activity (physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle), and service (an unpaid collaborative and reciprocal engagement with the community). This year, students will complete the CAS Project, a series of related CAS experiences where groups of people work towards a common goal. During CAS 1 or CAS 2, students will also complete a Collaborative Sevice Project.

    This is the first year of a two-year commitment.  CAS aims to develop students who are:
    1) reflective thinkers- they understand their own strengths and limitations, identify goals, and devise strategies for personal growth
    2) willing to accept new challenges and new roles
    3) aware of themselves as members of communities with responsibilities towards each other and the environment
    4) active participants in sustained, collaborative projects
    5) balanced- they enjoy and find significance in a range of activities involving intellectual, physical, creative, and emotional experiences

    Over two years students will plan, complete, gather evidence for, and reflect on extracurricular experiences that develop creativity (C), activity (A), and service (S). They will have a CAS Advisor to meet with and share quarterly progress. 

    Units of Study
    Understanding CAS
    Managing the CAS Portfolio
    Reflecting on CAS Learning Outcomes
    Complete CAS Project (Junior Work Week)
    Participate in a Collaborative Service Project



  • IB CAS 2 - Grade 12

    Grade 12

    Additional fee: A fee applies to all students for IB assessment.

    Creativity, Activity, Service provides students with the chance to participate in a range of experiences alongside their academic studies. The three strands of CAS are creativity (arts, and other experiences that involve creative thinking), activity (physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle), and service (an unpaid collaborative and reciprocal engagement with the community). By the end of April, students will have participated in a Collaborative Service project. 

    This is the second year of the two-year CAS experience. CAS aims to develop students who are:
    1) reflective thinkers- they understand their own strengths and limitations, identify goals, and devise strategies for personal growth
    2) willing to accept new challenges and new roles
    3) aware of themselves as members of communities with responsibilities towards each other and the environment
    4) active participants in sustained, collaborative projects
    5) balanced- they enjoy and find significance in a range of activities involving intellectual, physical, creative, and emotional experiences.

    Units of Study
    Understanding CAS
    Managing the CAS Portfolio
    Reflecting on CAS Learning Outcomes
    Complete CAS Project (Junior Work Week)
    Participate in a Collaborative Service Project


  • IB Extended Essay 1 - Grade 11

    Grade 11
    0.5 credit

    To retain the credit for IB Extended Essay 1, students are required to complete IB Extended Essay 2. If both years are not completed, the 0.5 credit from EE 1 will also be removed. 

    Prerequisite: Recommendation from the IB Coordinator

    Additional Fee: IB fees will be incurred in IB Extended Essay 2.

    The Extended Essay presents students with an opportunity to explore a topic of special interest. Students engage in an independent, self-directed piece of research, finishing with a 4,000-word paper. Through this experience, students develop the self-regulated research and writing skills that they need to be successful in college. This year, students will select the subject in which they will write their essay, draft a research question, and write an outline of their essay.

    This year's course is for juniors in the IB Diploma Programme or juniors who wish to be an IB Extended Essay candidate. Year 1 includes the formation of a research question, creation of a research strategy, building a supporting bibliography, refining a thesis, and developing an outline. Significant summer work is common for preparation for IB Extended Essay 2.

    Units of Study
    Introduction to the Extended Essay
    Research Cycle
    Research and Writing


  • IB Extended Essay 2 - Grade 12

    Grade 12
    0.5 credit

    Completion of IB Extended Essay 2 is required for a student to be recognized as an IB Extended Essay candidate. If both years are not completed, the 0.5 credit from TOK 1 will also be removed. 

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Extended Essay 1.

    Additional Fee: This course has an IB examination component. A fee applies to all students in the course.

    The Extended Essay presents students with an opportunity to explore a topic of special interest. Students engage in an independent, self-directed piece of research, finishing with a 4,000-word paper. Through this experience, students develop the self-regulated research and writing skills that they need to be successful in college. This year, students will select the subject in which they will write their essay, draft a research question, and write an outline of their essay.

    This year's course is for seniors in the IB Diploma Programme or seniors completing their IB Extended Essay candidacy. Year 2 includes creating, editing, evaluating and revising the research paper and a final interview on the process with the faculty supervisor. The final draft of the Extended Essay will be awarded a grade by the International Baccalaureate Organization.

    Units of Study
    Introduction to the Extended Essay
    Research Cycle
    Research and Writing




  • IB Theory of Knowledge 1 - Grade 11

    Grade 11
    0.5 credit

    To retain the credit for IB Theory of Knowledge 1, students are required to complete IB Theory of Knowledge 2. If both years are not completed, the 0.5 credit from TOK 1 will also be removed. 

    Prerequisite:  Recommendation from the IB Coordinator

    Additional Fee: IB fees will be incurred in IB Theory of Knowledge 2.

    Theory of Knowledge explores questions about knowledge and the process of knowing. TOK emphasizes comparisons and connections between areas of knowledge and encourages students to become more aware of their own perspectives and the perspectives of others. This year, students will complete their internal assessment, which is an exhibition of three objects connected to one of the TOK themes.

    This is a year-long course for juniors intending to complete the Theory of Knowledge (TOK) program their senior year.  TOK is central to the educational philosophy of the International Baccalaureate. It challenges students and their teachers to reflect critically on diverse ways of knowing and areas of knowledge and to consider the role that knowledge plays in a global society. It encourages students to become aware of themselves as thinkers, to reflect on the complexity of knowledge, and to recognize the need to act responsibly in an increasingly interconnected world. As a thoughtful and purposeful inquiry into different ways of knowing, and into different kinds of knowledge, the TOK program is composed almost entirely of questions. Concepts are investigated through means of guided activities. Students are expected to engage actively in discussion, model the IB Learner Profile, and articulate their viewpoints with strong oral and written communication skills.


    Units of Study
    How is our understanding of the world influenced by the way knowledge is constructed?
    How is new knowledge about the world created?
    How do we become discerning knowers?
    Explore themes of knowledge in technology, language, politics, religion, and indigenous societies.
    Explore areas of knowledge in history, human sciences, natural sciences, the arts, and mathematics
    Essay (External Assessment)


  • IB Theory of Knowledge 2 - Grade 12

    Grade 12
    0.5 credit

    Completion of IB Theory of Knowledge 2 is required for a student to be recognized as an IB Theory of Knowledge candidate. If both years are not completed, the 0.5 credit from TOK 1 will also be removed. 

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Theory of Knowledge 1.

    Additional Fee: This course has an IB examination component. A fee applies to all students in the course.

    Theory of Knowledge explores questions about knowledge and the process of knowing. TOK emphasizes comparisons and connections between areas of knowledge and encourages students to become more aware of their perspectives and the perspectives of others. This year, students will complete their internal assessment, which is an exhibition of three objects connected to one of the TOK themes.

    The second part of the Theory of Knowledge (ToK) program is a year-long course for seniors.  It continues to challenge students and their teachers to reflect critically on diverse ways of knowing and areas of knowledge, and to consider the role which knowledge plays in a global society. It encourages students to become aware of themselves as thinkers, to reflect on the complexity of knowledge, and to recognize the need to act responsibly in an increasingly interconnected world. Concepts are investigated through means of guided activities. Students are expected to engage actively in discussion, model the IB Learner Profile, and articulate their viewpoints with strong oral and written communication skills.


    Units of Study
    How is our understanding of the world influenced by the way knowledge is constructed?
    How is new knowledge about the world created?
    How do we become discerning knowers?
    Explore themes of knowledge in technology, language, politics, religion, and indigenous societies.
    Explore areas of knowledge in history, human sciences, natural sciences, the arts, and mathematics
    Essay (External Assessment)

  • IB Language A: Literature Self-Taught - Grade 11

    Grade 11
    1 Credit

    Prerequisite:  IB diploma candidate and permission of IB DP Coordinator
    Additional Fee:  IB examination fees will be incurred in the second year of the course.

    This is the first year of a two-year independent study course available for IB diploma candidates whose first language is not English. In the course, the student will study a range of texts from different periods, styles, and genres in his or her first language while developing the ability to engage in a close, detailed analysis of individual texts. Approval for the course depends on previous academic experience in the first language and the study of literature, demonstration of independent-learning skills, and future needs of the student. Any interested non-IB diploma candidate can see the IB DP Coordinator for course availability.

    Units of Study
    Reading Analytically – New Criticism and Postcolonialism
    Writing Analytically - Body Paragraphs
    Non-fiction Read / Write - Comparison Body Paragraphs & Practice HL Essay 1
    Read / Write Contemporary Fiction - Practice HL Essay 2
    IB Syllabus HL Essay Authors - Read/Write/Close Study
    Works in Translation – Group Presentation
    Works in Translation – Close Study/Read/Write
  • IB Language A: Literature Self-Taught SL - Grade 12

    Grade 12
    1 Credit

    Prerequisite:  Satisfactory completion of the first year of course and permission of IB DP Coordinator
    Additional Fee:  Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam.

    This is the second year of a two-year independent study course available for IB diploma candidates whose first language is not English. The student will continue to study a range of texts from different periods, styles, and genres in his or her first language while developing the ability to engage in a close, detailed analysis of individual texts. The student will continue to develop skills in both oral and written expression and complete required IB assessments. Demonstration of good self-management skills in grade 11 is essential.

    Units of Study
    Analyzing Rhetoric and Investigating the Impact of Historical and Cultural Context
    Analyzing Fiction/Drama and the Craft of the Writer
    Analyzing and Interpreting Poetry
    Preparing for the Individual Oral (IO) 
    Intertextuality: Past and Present- Comparing Classic and Contemporary Works
    Preparing for Paper 1 and Paper 2 Exams

IB French

List of 3 items.

  • IB French B SL - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of a B+ in French 3H or 4H

    Additional Fee: $10.00 for a French magazine subscription. Students in grade 12 enrolled in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Students in grade 11 who do not plan to take IB French HL in their senior year are required to complete a virtual component of the course outside of class that will total 28 hours throughout the year. These students are also expected to take the IB exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams.

    This course prepares students for the IB French Language Exams. The IB grade is determined by four factors. One factor is the internal assessment (IA) grade, which is scored by the instructor through various oral activities, the most significant being the 15-minute individual oral presentation/discussion, to take place in the second semester. There will also be a larger written activity that is externally assessed. Two additional factors occur on the scheduled IB exam days, including a 250-word essay in French, as well as various questions and short answers based on authentic French-language reading materials.

    IB French SL consists of activities to develop skills that will effectively prepare students for these components, including daily speaking practice that targets grammar and vocabulary. Debates, interactive oral activities, and small writing assignments are regular tasks. The IB rubrics, in whole or in part, are used to evaluate most oral and written activities. Students explore IB themes through film, contemporary and classic literature, art, images, video, online audio, and current events from the French-speaking world.

    In concordance with the aims of the IB Organization, IB French seeks to promote understanding of another culture through the study of a second language. All IB programs aim to develop internationally minded people, who, recognizing their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world.

    Units of Study
    Greetings
    The Francophone World
    Technology, Are we too connected?
    Technology and education of tomorrow
    Health and well-being
    Family Relationships
    Friendship and solving conflicts
    Our Planet
    Pollution and Renewable energy
    GMO v Organic foods, Growing a greener world
  • Virtual Language Learning - Grade 11

    Corequisite: IB French B SL

    This is a required curriculum component of approximately 30 hours for students in grade 11 who plan to take the IB SL language exam. These hours are required to take the SL exam. Learning modules are managed through a Google classroom and assessments are recorded in the corequisite course. The deadline to start Virtual Language Learning (VLL) is October 1.


  • IB French B HL - Grade 12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB French B SL

    Additional Fee: Students enrolled in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam.

    This course prepares students for the IB French Language Exam at the higher level (HL). The IB grade is determined by four factors. One factor is the internal assessment (IA) grade, which is scored by the instructor through various oral activities, the most significant being the 15-minute individual oral presentation/discussion, to take place in the second semester. There will also be a larger written activity that is externally assessed. Two additional factors occur on the scheduled IB exam days, including a 400-word essay in French, as well as various questions and short answers based on authentic French-language reading materials. 

    IB French HL consists of activities to develop skills that will effectively prepare students for these components, including daily speaking practice that targets grammar and vocabulary. Debates, interactive oral activities, writing assignments, and readings from classic French literature are regular tasks. The IB rubrics, in whole or in part, are used to evaluate most oral and written activities.  Students explore IB themes through film, contemporary and classic literature, art, images, video, online audio, and current events from the French-speaking world.

    In concordance with the aims of the IB Organization, IB French seeks to promote understanding of another culture through the study of a second language. The aim of all IB programs is to develop internationally minded people, who, recognizing their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world. 

    Units of Study
    L'Amitié
    Immigration
    Why learn a second language? Why French
    Social relations
    Médias (La France Vue par le Monde)
    Readings: 
    The Little Prince
    The Man Who Planted Trees
    Kiffe Kiffe, Demain
    A selection of short stories

IB Latin

List of 3 items.

  • IB Latin SL - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of a B+ in Latin 3H or 4H

    Additional Fee: Students in grade 12 enrolled in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Students in grade 11 who do not plan to take IB Latin HL in their senior year are required to complete a virtual component of the course outside of class that will total 28 hours throughout the year. These students are also expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking the exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams.

    The course involves intensive study of Latin literary works by multiple authors to prepare students for both the sight translation and prepared translation and analysis portions of the IB Latin SL exam. Students will complete an Internal Assessment research dossier on an ancient topic. Students learn through group translations in class, discussion of cultural and historical contexts, and review of grammar and vocabulary. Skills emphasized are accurate translations of Latin text and literary analysis. To be successful in this class, students need to have a strong foundation in Latin grammar and be open-minded, diligent, and analytical.

    Units of Study
    Catullus 64 – Ariadne’s Lament
    Vergil’s Aeneid Book II – The Fall of Troy
    Ovid’s Heroides – Dido’s Letter to Aeneas
    Sight Translation Practice
    Internal Assessment
    IB Exam Review


  • Virtual Language Learning - Grade 11

    Corequisite: IB Latin SL

    This is a required curriculum component of approximately 30 hours for students in grade 11 who plan to take the IB SL language exam. These hours are required to take the SL exam. Learning modules are managed through a Google classroom and assessments are recorded in the corequisite course. The deadline to start Virtual Language Learning (VLL) is October 1.
  • IB Latin HL - Grade 12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Latin SL

    Additional Fee: Students enrolled in IB Latin HL are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam.

    The course involves advanced, intensive study of Latin literary works by multiple authors to prepare students for both the sight translation and prepared translation and analysis portions of the IB Latin HL exam. Students will write an original Latin composition inspired by their reading of authentic Latin texts. Students learn through group translations in class, discussion of cultural and historical contexts, and review of grammar and vocabulary. Skills emphasized are accurate translations of Latin text and literary analysis. To be successful in this class, students need to have a strong foundation in Latin grammar and be open-minded, diligent, and analytical.

    Units of Study
    Cicero’s Pro Caelio – The Infamous Cataline and Clodia
    Sight Translation Practice
    Composition
    IB Exam Review


IB Spanish

List of 3 items.

  • IB Spanish B SL - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite:
    Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of a B+ in Spanish 3H or 4H

    Additional Fee:  Students in grade 12 enrolled in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam. Students in grade 11 who do not plan to take IB Spanish HL in their senior year are required to complete a virtual component of the course outside of class that will total 28 hours throughout the year. These students are also expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking the exam. Please see the information in the Overview section about IB exams. 

    This course prepares students for the IB Spanish B Language Exams. The IB grade is determined by four factors. One factor is the internal assessment (IA) grade, which is scored by the instructor through the 15-minute individual oral presentation/discussion, to take place in the second semester. Three additional factors occur on the scheduled IB exam days, including a 250-word essay in Spanish, as well as various questions and short answers based on authentic Spanish-language reading materials, and a listening comprehension component. 

    IB Spanish SL consists of activities to develop skills that will effectively prepare students for these components, including daily speaking practice that targets grammar and vocabulary. Debates, interactive oral activities, and small writing assignments are regular tasks. The IB rubrics, in whole or in part, are used to evaluate most oral and written activities. Students taking this course should be open-minded and curious about other perspectives. They should be independent learners able to synthesize concepts in reading, writing, listening, and speaking activities.

    In concordance with the aims of the IB Organization, IB Spanish seeks to promote understanding of another culture through the study of a second language. The aim of all IB programs is to develop internationally minded people, who, recognizing their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world.

    Units of Study
    Searching for New Adventures
    Che Guevara
    Immigration 
    Young People in the World Today
    Afro-Latino Culture
    Frida Kahlo and the Selfie
    Food Challenges
    Sustainability
  • Virtual Language Learning - Grade 11

    Corequisite: IB Spanish B SL

    This is a required curriculum component of 28 hours for students in grade 11 who plan to take the IB SL language exam.  Learning modules are managed through a Google classroom and assessments are recorded in the corequisite course. The deadline to start Virtual Language Learning (VLL) is October 1.
  • IB Spanish B HL - Grade 12

    1 Credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Spanish B SL

    Additional Fee: Students enrolled in IB Spanish HL are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam.

    The International Baccalaureate Organization’s expressed mission is to encourage students to be knowledgeable and inquiring, but also caring and compassionate. There is a strong emphasis on encouraging students to develop intercultural understanding, open-mindedness, and the attitudes necessary for them to respect and evaluate a range of points of view. The goals of IB Spanish Higher Level are directly aligned with IB's mission. Over the course of the year, students will develop a fluent or near-fluent proficiency in the Spanish language while exploring various global themes, issues, and Spanish and Latin American literature. 

    Students will enhance their skills in communicating clearly and effectively in a range of situations, demonstrating linguistic competence and intercultural understanding; using language appropriate to a range of interpersonal and/or cultural contexts; understanding and using language to express and respond to a range of ideas with accuracy and fluency, organizing ideas on a range of topics, in a clear, coherent and convincing manner; understanding, analyzing and responding to a range of written and spoken texts; and understanding and using works of literature written in the target language of study.

    The course explores content through a variety of sources including music, dance, art, literature, feature films, historical records, documentary films, and more. This course is recommended for students with a genuine desire to become fluent in Spanish and a strong interest in global issues with a focus on Latin America. 

    Units of Study
    Identities
    Experiences
    Human Ingenuity
    Social Organization
    Sharing the Planet
    Various literary selections