Academics
Departments & Curriculum
Course Description Guide 2024-25

Electives (2024-25)

All courses beyond the minimum graduation requirements are considered elective credits. Yearlong and semester classes designated as elective courses are intended to supplement a student’s regular program. This page represents the most commonly selected electives, but may not be exhaustive. Some year-long courses from other departments may qualify as electives.

English

List of 3 items.

  • Creative Writing - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 credit

    Creative Writing offers an introduction to fiction writing in a collaborative, relaxed atmosphere. Short stories are read and discussed that model basic elements such as description, dialogue, action, and plot. Students learn and grow as writers both by writing but also through the elements of peer review, workshop, and revision. Individual pieces are revised and changed and then re-submitted in a final portfolio at the end of each quarter. This semester elective can be taken more than once for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    Story Arc
    Character Development
    Backstory
    Dialogue
    Connection to Human Truth
    Planning, Editing, and Revising
  • Rock & Roll Lit - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 credit

    In this course, students will study the history and literature of Rock and Roll from the bluesmen of the 1920s through the indie rock movement of the early 2000s. Students will read short stories, rock criticism, and excerpts from well-known biographies and autobiographies while maintaining a focus on the close-reading of song lyrics. Students will develop an appreciation for active listening, perform close-readings regularly, write album reviews, and perform and present research and analysis on artists or movements of their choosing. This is a semester-long elective for students in grades 9-12--especially those with a particular interest in rock and roll music and/or poetry analysis.

    Units of Study
    The Blues
    Rock and Roll Pioneers
    The Beatles
    Love Songs
    Protest Songs
    Sad Songs--Alienation, Depression, Isolation, Addiction, Death
    Existentialism and Religion: Why are we here? What’s all this for?
    Pastoral Songs
    Teen Angst
    Narratives
  • Public Speaking - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 credit

    In this course, students will practice the art and craft of foundational communication. Each day, students will participate in individual and group games and exercises that will build up their stage presence and confidence as speakers in both academic and real-world settings. For academic settings, students will learn basic presentation skills, including slideshow design and presentation technology. Students will practice group discussion and debate, using conversation skills to advance academic arguments. Students will also study professionals at work as they practice interviewing skills and create an “elevator speech” for a business setting. Additionally, students will practice social speeches, including toasts and introductions. This is a hands-on, highly participatory class where students can expect to give and receive constant feedback. 
    Throughout the course, students will reflect on their growth as speakers and listeners. 
     
    Units of Study
    Speaking Confidence
    Conversation Skills
    Stage Presence
    Basic Presentation
    Interviewing and Business Etiquette
    Social Speeches

Math

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  • AP Statistics - Grades 10-12

    1 Credit
    Prerequisites: Algebra 2 or Algebra 2 Honors with a grade of B or higher and teacher recommendation based on B or higher in current English course.

    Required Tools: TI-84 Plus Series calculator 

    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam.  A fee applies to all students taking this exam.

    This course closely follows the recommendations of the Committee on Statistics of the Advanced Placement Program. While the class is in the mathematics department, 99% of the computation is done on the calculator. The class emphasizes discussion of these calculations and the meaning of the numbers. Most learning is done through traditional lectures with practice problem homework assignments. Activities and experiments are done for demonstration of concepts where appropriate and time permitting. A successful student will have strong reading comprehension and good number sense.

    Units of Study
    Displaying Data
    Modeling Distributions
    Least Squares Regression
    Designing Studies
    Probability
    Random Variables
    Sampling Distributions
    One Sample Confidence Intervals
    One Sample Hypothesis Tests
    Comparing Two Populations
    Chi-Squared Tests
    Regression Inference
  • Introduction to Statistics - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit
    Prerequisite: Algebra 2/Trigonometry
    Required Tools: TI-84 Plus Series calculator

    Introduction to Statistics is a course designed to give students a feel for what the course of statistics is about and give them a strong foundation for any college-level introductory statistics course. Most learning is done through traditional lectures with practice problem homework assignments. Hands-on activities and experiments will be done to demonstrate certain topics as time permits. Memorization of formulas and definitions is not required. Students may use notecards on tests and quizzes.  This course is excellent preparation for students with an interest in business, science, education, law, computer science, and related fields.

    Units of Study
    Analyzing One Variable Statistics
    Describing the Relationships Between Two Variables
    Collecting Data
    Probability
    Random Variables
    Sampling Distributions
    One Sample Confidence Intervals
    Hypothesis Testing
    Sampling Inference Methods
    Chi-Squared Test and Regression Inference

Music

List of 12 items.

  • Piano Keyboard 1 - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit

    Required tools: Students will need to have a piano or keyboard at home for individual practice. The school has a limited number of instruments that can be loaned to students who need one.

    This elective course is designed for students with minimal to no experience with playing the piano. This course will introduce the fundamentals of piano playing and musicianship, including basic music theory, history, aural skills, and note reading. We will cover a wide variety of styles, including classical, jazz, pop, rock, and blues. Students learn through listening and responding, participating fully during class, and with some practice time outside of class. We will be using Alfred’s Adult Group Piano Method Book. There will be an end-of-semester opportunity for performance as a solo, duet, or small group.

    This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    Keyboard Basics
    Grand Staff Notation
    Major and Minor Scales and Arpeggios
    Chord Qualities in Major and Minor Keys
    Improvisation and Harmonization
    Solo Repertoire
  • Piano Keyboard 2 - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 credit

    Required Tools: Students will need to have a piano or keyboard at home for individual practice. The school has a limited number of instruments that can be loaned to students who need one.

    This elective course is designed for students with at least one year of private piano lessons or one semester of Intro to Piano- Beginning Keyboard Skills class.  This course will build upon the fundamentals of piano playing and musicianship, including moving more in-depth into music theory, history, aural skills, and note reading. We will cover a wide variety of styles, including classical, jazz, pop, rock, and blues.  Students learn through listening and responding, participating fully during class, and with some practice time outside of class. We will be using Alfred’s Adult Group Piano Method Book. There will be an end-of-semester opportunity for performance as an ensemble or small group.

    This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study:
    Keyboard Geography
    Grand Staff Notation 
    Major and Minor Scales and Arpeggios
    Chord Qualities in Major and Minor Keys
    Improvisation and Harmonization
    Solo Repertoire
  • Preparatory Band - Grades 8-11

    Grades 8-11
    0.5 Credit 
    Required Tools:  Once an instrument choice has been made, students will need to rent or buy that instrument from area stores (except for tuba or electric bass)

    This course develops the fundamentals of playing a school band instrument. (brass, woodwind, percussion, or electric bass) Additionally, essential elements of music theory will also be explored. Students learn by playing as well as class discussion and analysis of musical selections. Students concurrently gain technique and musical knowledge, learn how to assess their playing, develop effective practice habits, and build musical independence and confidence. This class is open to all students, especially those that would like to eventually play in the school's Pep, Concert, and Jazz Bands. The main factors for student success in this course are some determination and a willingness to practice consistently. There are several performance opportunities throughout the year. Students that wish to play in the Advanced Band (including Pep Band) the following year, should enroll in this class for both semesters. (total of 1 credit)

    Units of Study
    Fundamentals: Instrument Assembly, Sound Production and Maintenance
    We're Underway: Initial Notes, Rhythms, and Terms 1
    How to Practice, the Effective and Fun Way
    Listening All-Around: Playing in a Group
    Rhythmic Subdivision 1: 8th Notes and Rests
    Creating Musical Drama: Articulations and Dynamics
    Playing in 2/4 and 3/4 Time 
    Musical Patterns: Bb, F, Eb, Ab, Db, and C Major Scales
    Intermediate Notes (ranging beyond 1 octave), Rhythms and Terms 2
    Musical Flow: Structural Symbols
    Performances! (December, March, and *May) * play w/Advanced Band for some numbers
    Dotted Quarter and Dotted 8th Notes
    Syncopation
    Advanced Notes (functional range for Advanced Band), Rhythms and Terms 3
    Musical Pattern: The Chromatic Scale
    Rhythmic Subdivision 2: 16th Notes and Rests
    Playing in 2/2 and 6/8 Time
  • Advanced Band - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    1 Credit

    PrerequisiteAt least 2 years of playing experience in a supervised setting (school ensemble or private lessons) OR completion of the Preparatory Band course with at least a 'B' grade and teacher recommendation. The student MUST be able to read music well; if her/his music reading ability is not secure, then the best course choice is Preparatory Band. Percussionists should have at least basic familiarity with and playing skills on mallet instruments. Any student that reads music well but with less than the required experience needs to see the director for a playing assessment before enrolling in this course. 

    Required ToolsStudents must have their own instrument with the exception of the following: tuba, bassoon, oboe, baritone sax, bass clarinet. Percussionists should own a snare drum or drum set and a bell set or keyboard/piano. Students need to purchase the "Tuning CD" and a metronome (any type is OK). These are one-time purchases that can be used in successive years.

    This course is designed to further develop each student's playing technique, musicianship (theory, concepts, terms) and to employ these in creating artful performances. A wide variety of musical styles are performed each year. Students learn by playing in each rehearsal as well as class discussion and analysis via critical listening of musical passages during rehearsals. Students learn to assess their own playing, create and implement effective practice habits to refine their skills based upon the requirements of the music, and work toward becoming independent and proficient musicians. This class is for musicians that enjoy the challenge of playing a wide range of music. This course is especially useful for any student wishing to pursue a career in music or that would like to build substantial musical skills that they can continue to enjoy in their post-school lives. The key qualities for students to be successful in this course are having enthusiasm, strong focus during rehearsals, consistent and effective practice habits, and a desire to be a productive contributor to an ensemble that seeks musical excellence. All band students perform for several school concerts per year as well as have the opportunity to play in the Trinity Pep Band, which performs for numerous sporting events during the fall and winter sports seasons. Additional experiences such as participation in various ensembles (jazz ensemble, district, all-state honors bands) are available to interested students who meet the qualifying criteria. This class may be repeated for credit with teacher recommendation.

    Units of Study
    Individual Musicianship: Determining What the Music Tells You to Work Upon 
    Effective Practice: Planning and Implementation
    Ensemble Musicianship: Critical Listening to the Music, Group and Your Roles
    Developing Artistry: Tone, Intonation, Articulation, Phrasing, Dynamic Shading
    Musical Independence and Leadership
    Popular Music Styles and Performances: 1st Semester
    Concert Band Music Styles and Performances: 2nd Semester
    Cabaret! Annual Theme Show (November or January)
    Holiday Concert (December)
    Spring Concert (March)
    Final Concert (May Fine Arts Festival)
  • Chorus - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit

    This elective course is designed to further develop each student's singing proficiency, enhance general musicianship (theory, concepts, terms) and grow as a more artistic performer. Students will have the opportunity to perform in several school concerts during the year. A variety of musical styles will be explored. Students learn through listening and responding, performing, singing in small groups and large ensembles, and performing mock auditions.  Any student, regardless of previous experience, can be successful in this class by participating fully and being willing to learn new musical skills. Additional experiences such as participation in select ensembles (District and All-State Chorus) are available to interested students who meet the qualifying criteria. This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    Practice Skills
    General Musicianship
    Vocal Technique
    Solfege
    Diction and Languages
    Sight Singing
    Music Theory
    Performance Skills
    Cabaret! Theme Show
    Winter Fine Arts Festival
    Spring Concert
    Spring Fine Arts Festival
  • Preparatory Strings - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit
    Required Tools:  Students must have their own instrument. Several area stores rent/sell string instruments.

    This elective course is designed for students with no experience with a stringed instrument as well as those students who have limited experience and need additional instruction to be prepared for the Orchestra class. This course will introduce the fundamentals of string playing and musicianship, including basic music theory, history, and note reading.  Students learn through listening and responding, participating fully during class, and with regular practice time outside of class. Additional experiences such as participation in select ensembles (District and Regional Orchestras) are available to interested students who meet the qualifying criteria. This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    General Musicianship Skills
    Ensemble Playing Skills
    Stringed Instrument Knowledge and Care
    Music Theory
    Tone Production and Intonation
    Winter Fine Arts Festival
    Spring Fine Arts Festival
  • Orchestra - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  At least one year of playing experience in a supervised setting (school or private lessons) or instructor recommendation
    Required Tools:  Students must have their own instrument. Several area stores rent/sell string instruments.

    This elective course is designed to further develop each student's playing proficiency, enhance their general musicianship (theory, concepts, terms), and become more artistic performers. Students will have the opportunity to perform in several school concerts during the year.  Students learn through listening and responding, participating fully during class, and regularly practicing outside of class. A variety of musical styles will be explored. Additional experiences such as participation in select ensembles (Central Regional and Senior Regional Orchestra, All-State Orchestra) are available to interested students who meet the qualifying criteria. This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    General Musicianship
    Ensemble Playing Skills
    Practice Habits and Techniques
    Major and Minor Scales
    Bow Technique - Tone and Articulation
    Left Hand Technique
    Music Theory
    Sight Reading
    Cabaret! Theme Show
    Winter Fine Arts Festival
    Spring Concert
    Spring Fine Arts Festival
  • Music Writing and Production - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit

    Prerequisite:  Any other Trinity music course with at least a 'B' grade or passing score on the Music Skills assessment

    This course investigates the musical (creating good song flow, solid bass lines and chord progressions, singable melody) and technical (proper recording levels, mic choices, and placement, effects such as EQ and compression, creating engaging mixes) aspects currently used in creating popular music. Students learn by critical listening to sample professional and student projects, active discussion of the topics being explored, and then apply these principles within their own audio projects. The bulk of class time is spent working on audio projects. Students will learn how to create songs that have solid musical construction and professional production values as well as analyze these facets in the works of artists that they listen to. This class is for student musicians who wish to improve their songwriting and production skills, particularly those who are considering a career in any musical media field. Students need to be inquisitive and open to listening to and drawing ideas from successful music in a variety of styles, not just those that are their favorites. Additionally, students taking this course need a solid sense of discipline to apply the principles that are learned and be able to remain on task when working independently.

    This class may be repeated for credit with instructor recommendation.

    Units of Study (Original Course)
    Studio Basics: Hardware and Software
    Song Structure 1: Bass and Drums
    Song Structure 2: Major/Minor Scales and Chord Progressions
    Melody Writing
    Microphones: Types and Placement Techniques
    Effects 1: EQ and Compression
    Effects 2: Reverb, Delay, and Other Time-based Effects
    Creating Dynamic and Engaging Mixes
    Independent Projects

    Units of Study (Supplementary Topics if course is repeated)
    Mastering and Distribution
    'Cover' Projects
    Lyric Writing
    Horn and String Section Writing
    Independent Projects 
    Stereo and Other Multiple Mic Techniques
    Video Game Scoring
    Jingle Writing
    Outboard Effects Processing
    TV and Film Scoring
    Creating an Audio Portfolio
  • Guitar 1 - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit
    Required Tools:  Students will need a functional Acoustic guitar for class. Ideally, they will provide their own instrument but there is a limited quantity of school instruments that may be checked out to a student for the semester if necessary. All students will also need a 1.5" 3 ring binder, an electronic tuner (preferably the clip-on type), 6 or more picks, 2 sets of extra strings for their style of guitar, and a capo. If a student borrows a school instrument, they will need to acquire these other materials and bring them to class.

    Guitar 1 investigates the universal language of music and how to express it with six strings. Beginning with rudimentary skills, the class works towards a solid understanding of both the instrument and basic music fundamentals. Students will learn about the elements of melody, rhythm, and harmony through an extensive variety of popular songs and other exercises.  In class, students will learn through interactive lessons and activities while playing songs together in a fun group environment. Students are also expected to use supplemental resources posted to Google Classroom and the instructor’s website to continue learning and effectively practice what is taught in class. This is not a performance-based class but students will be required to perform together once in the semesterly Fine Arts Festival.

    This class is appropriate for both aspiring players with absolutely no experience as well as guitarists who have experience but lack a strong comprehension of fundamental music skills.  Preparation, participation, focus, and respect are important for learning in a group setting and out of class, a routine of effective practice is imperative for improving skills.

    Enrollment in Guitar 2 is contingent upon either completing this class or demonstrating proficiency in the skills covered by an interview with the instructor.
     
    Units of Study
    Understanding Music as a Universal Language
    Instrumental Voices and Why the Guitar is Awesome!
    Transitioning from Enjoying Music to Playing It…
    What You Need to Know About Your Guitar and How to Use It
    Understanding, Speaking, and Reading Pitch as a Guitarist.
    Melody, Riffs, and Phrasing Musical Ideas as Conversation
    The Process of Progress: Effectively Learning and Practicing
    Comprehending, Reading, and Applying Rhythm as a Guitarist
    Building Harmony and Chord Shapes in the “Open Position”
    Chord Progressions, following Song Structure, and Common Strum Patterns
    Playing Songs in Different Styles/Genres using Similar Groups of Chord Shapes as an Application of Skills
    The Capo, How To Use It, and Making Difficult Songs Easy
    Pick Patterns, Basic Finger-Style, and Additional Techniques
    Preparing for and Performing as an Ensemble (December/May Fine Arts Concert)
    Life after Guitar 1
  • Guitar 2 - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  Guitar 1 and/or teacher recommendation
    Required Tools:   Students will need a functional Acoustic Guitar, a 1.5" binder dedicated to the class, an electronic tuner, 2 extra sets of strings appropriate to their style of guitar, 6 or more picks, and a Capo.

    Guitar 2 is intended for competent intermediate and advancing guitarists with a functional understanding of the material covered in Guitar 1. Students will move beyond the open position and delve into bar chord shapes, extended chords, building major and minor scales, relationships between chords and key, arpeggios, lead technique, improvising, and other areas of fretboard knowledge. This is not a performance-based class, but students will be required to perform together once in the semesterly Fine Arts Festival.
    Building on the fundamentals acquired in Guitar 1, this course continues to investigate understanding the diverse language of music and how it can be expressed with the instrument. Students will learn to build their vocabulary by unlocking the fretboard and delving into more advanced skills, styles, and techniques as well as music theory applied through a broad range of songs.  In class, students will learn through interactive lessons, lectures, activities, and playing songs together in a fun group environment. Students are also expected to use supplemental resources posted to google classroom and the instructor’s website to continue learning and effectively practice what is taught in class.

    This course is intended for competent intermediate and advancing guitarists with a functional understanding of the material covered in Guitar 1 and a desire to learn more. Enrollment is contingent upon either completing Guitar 1 this or demonstrating proficiency in the skills covered by an interview with the instructor.

    Guitar 2 prepares students for a more informed pursuit of their musical interests and to take other departmental classes such as Guitar 3, Studio Music Production. It also puts students on track to take IB Music or CoLAB if they aspire to do so.  With increasingly complex material, the importance of engagement, focus during class and routine use of resources for effective out-of-class practice become even more imperative.

    Units of Study
    Leaving the Open Position with “Floating” Chord Shapes
    Unlocking the Fretboard and Playing Melodically Beyond the 5th Fret.
    Introduction to Major Scale Theory, Key Signatures, Intervals, and Building
    The Circle of 5ths and Why It is Useful
    Introduction to and Application of Basic “Closed” Barre Chord Shapes
    Extended Harmony, Evolving Chord Shapes, and Arpeggios
    Introduction to and Application of Major Pentatonic Scales
    Relative Minor Scales, Natural Minor Scales, and Building Harmony in minor Keys
    Introduction to and Application of Minor Pentatonic Scales
    Expression and Additional Techniques
    Introduction to Improvisation and Innovation
    Critical Listening Development
    Appreciation of the History and Evolution of the Guitar in Popular Music
    Preparing for and Performing as an Ensemble (December/May Fine Arts Concert)
    Life After Guitar 2
  • Guitar 3 - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 Credit

    Prerequisites:  Guitar 2 and Instructor Approval. This class may be repeated for credit with the approval of the Instructor as specific content taught varies each semester.

    Required Tools:  Students will need a functional Acoustic Guitar, a 1.5" binder dedicated to the class, an electronic tuner, 2 extra sets of strings appropriate to their style of guitar, 6 or more picks, a Capo, and a Guitar Strap.

    Continuing to grow from the knowledge, theory, and skills learned in previous courses, Guitar 3 moves towards an exploration of instrumental communication on an advanced level through an in-depth study of songs, playing styles, and influential musicians in the evolution of sonic culture. Specific songs and application of content rotate from year to year but students will continue to develop melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic skills, connecting chord and scale theory with playing techniques to build a stronger musical vocabulary.

    In class, students will learn through interactive lessons, lectures, and activities and by playing songs together in a fun group environment. Students are also expected to use supplemental resources posted to google classroom and the instructor’s website to continue learning and effectively practice what is taught in class.  Guitar 3 prepares students for serious pursuit of musical interests beyond the classroom and opens the door for them to take either IB Music or CoLAB with approval from the instructor. Motivated learning, engagement, and focus during class as well as routine use of resources for effective out-of-class practice are crucial.

    Units of Study
    Review of Knowledge and Skills Expected to Be Known
    Recognizing Similarities and Differences Between Songs by Key
    Engaging I-IV-V Chord Progressions, Variations, and Riffs
    Songs by Notable Guitarists
    Stylistic Explorations
    Drop and Alternate Tunings, Partial Capo Techniques
    Improvising
    Fingerpicking
  • Collaborative Music Studies - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 Credit

    Prerequisite: Guitar 3 and/or Instructor Recommendation after demonstration of satisfactory proficiency on a primary instrument. 

    Required Tools:  Students are expected to provide their own primary instrument.

    CoLAB is about investigating the possibilities of what can be done with 12 notes, building confidence, and practical skills, and learning to navigate the experience of musical collaboration in a safe, structured, and supportive environment. Students learn experientially by playing and exploring structured songs together, exercises designed to develop and apply practical skills, experimenting with instruments from the school’s collection, workshops, and demonstrations by guest artists, using laptops in conjunction with studio resources to record and grow ideas, working towards the ultimate goal of performing together in a live setting.

    This class is appropriate for serious musicians who have achieved a strong level of technical proficiency on their instrument and are interested in developing practical collaborative skills working together with other musicians.

    This course may be repeated for credit with instructor permission.

    Units of Study
    Instigating Collaboration and Finding Common Ground in the Vast Potential of 12 Notes.
    The Art of Conversation: Leading, Following, and Dropping into Uncharted Musical Territory
    Challenges and Pitfalls of Working with Musicians and How to Manage Them
    Bringing Songs to the Table, Building a Repertoire, and the Importance of Structure
    Improvising: Listening, Responding, and Learning to Take Risks with Confidence.
    Sonic Diversity and Developing Versatility from the Familiar
    Exploring the Un-familiar...Vocals and Other Instruments
    The Creative Cycle: Imitation, Inspiration, and Innovation
    Developing Ideas, Demos, and Studio Recording
    Gigging: Preparing, Rehearsing, and Doing it Live

Social Studies

List of 5 items.

  • Archaeology - Grades 10-12

    Grades 10-12
    1.0 credit

    This course does not count toward the social studies graduation requirement.

    In this year-long elective, students get to come face-to-face with the physical remains of the past and use them to help solve the puzzles of history. Archaeology is the study of the human past through material remains. The field of archaeology lies at the intersection of STEM and the humanities. Archaeological scientists use cutting-edge technology to extract the tracest clues from the material remains of the past. Archaeologists then piece together these faint and fragmentary hints and create dynamic interpretations that answer research questions and provide a window into past human lives. Ancient texts and long-accepted narratives are tested against the physical evidence left by past people. Beyond the texts, archaeology provides a powerful leveling tool for the examination of history, providing evidence that allows scholars to tell the stories of the poor, underprivileged, women, and oppressed groups who are often absent from written historical narratives. The difficult questions raised by the history of archaeology and the global antiquities trade touch on colonialism, cultural representation, and international relations. In this course, students will become familiar with the basics of field archaeology, as well as the underlying theory and basic history of the discipline. Students will also develop their ability to synthesize different types of evidence into coherent narratives, learn how to form research questions, and acquire a hands-on understanding of how science and the humanities work symbiotically in a vibrant and active academic discipline.
     
    Units of Study
    History of archaeology
    Major archaeological sites
    Archaeological theory and methods
    Experimental archaeology
    Archaeological ethics
    Archaeological illustration
    The antiquities trade and colonialism, international antiquities law
    Technology in archaeology
    Pseudo-archeology and its perils
    Cultural and historical resource management
    Archaeological fieldwork (survey and/or excavation)
  • Contemporary Women's Studies - Grades 10-12

    Grades 10-12
    0.5 credit

    Prerequisite: 10th graders need a teacher recommendation (Social Studies)

    The American historical narrative is undoubtedly a story of women, and yet, this lens of study is often underutilized. Women, despite legal and cultural barriers, have been actively engaged in every phase of the nation’s history. This course serves as an introduction to the study of women as a diverse social group with a history, culture, and experience of their own. Contemporary Women's Studies allows students to evaluate the critical roles of women in advancing American politics and society. The course will focus on the 20th century to the present day with special emphasis on the four waves of feminism.

    Units of Study:
    First Wave of Feminism- Late 19th, Early 20th Century, Suffrage and Legal Rights
    Second Wave of Feminism- 1970s, Equality, Discrimination, Emergence of Women’s History
    Third Wave of Feminism- 1990s, Gen X, and the Riot Girrl Movement
    Fourth Wave- 21st Century 2010s to Present, Women's Empowerment, MeToo, Identity, and the LGBTQ+ Community
  • Faith in Film - Grades 10-12

    0.5 Credit

    Faith in Film does not count toward the religion graduation requirement.

    Faith in Film is a systematic theology class intended to examine and discuss the major tenets of the Christian faith. These doctrines will then be illustrated through various genres of film. Students will analyze these doctrines and attempt to reconcile them to their personal beliefs. Students do not have to confess to Christianity to take this course but should have some interest in developing a deeper knowledge of Christianity. Certain movies viewed in the course are intended for mature minds; students must have parental consent to take this class. Key skills include critical thinking skills, primary source document skills, and film analysis skills. 

    Units of Study
    Christian Anthropology
    Demonology
    The Problem of Evil
    Paterology
    Christology
    Pneumatology
    Ecclesiology
    Eschatology 


  • Personal Finance - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 Credit

    Personal Finance is a challenging, engaging project-based course that presents real-world concepts designed to help the student make wise spending, saving, and credit decisions and to make effective use of income to achieve personal financial goals. Students will design personal and household budgets utilizing checking and saving accounts, gain knowledge in finance, debt, and credit management, and evaluate and understand insurance and taxes. Students enrolled in personal finance should expect to complete case studies, plan monthly budgets, compete in a stock market simulation, listen to engaging guest speakers and participate in out-of-classroom experiences such as a field trip to the Federal Reserve.

    Units of Study
    Basics of Economics
    Banking Basics
    Income and Taxes
    Consumer Skills
    Planning for Living
  • Politics in Film - Grades 10-12

    Grades 10-12
    0.5 Credit

    Politics in Film explores popular political topics such as education, civil liberties, and laws affecting teenagers. Students will engage and discuss the content of each issue. Films will be used as an interpretation and springboard to a full analysis of the topic. Through journals and discussions, students will develop an understanding of how film informs and influences the way Americans view political issues. Certain movies viewed in the course are intended for mature minds; students must have parental consent to take the class. Key skills include critical thinking skills, primary source document skills, and film analysis skills.

    Units of Study
    Equal Opportunity Laws
    Education
    Abortion
    Laws Affecting Teenagers
    Immigration Laws
    Lobby Groups
    Civil Liberties
    Foreign Policy

Religion

List of 3 items.

  • Old Testament - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit

    Old Testament satisfies the religion graduation requirement.

    “In the beginning when God created...” These words written thousands of years ago continue to impact humanity. This class is an introduction to the rich history, stories, and beliefs preserved by the Jewish people. Primary content is devoted to historical movements, biblical characters, and various forms of text criticism. Secondary content includes how Old Testament themes connect to the New Testament. Key skills include critical thinking skills, scope and sequence skills, periodization skills.

    Units of Study
    Biblical Prehistory
    Patriarchs and Matriarchs
    Theocracy
    Monarchy
    Prophets and Exiles
    Restoration
  • New Testament - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit

    New Testament satisfies the religion graduation requirement.

    This course begins with Jesus of Nazareth. Jesus asked the apostle Peter, "Who do you say that I am?" The students will thoroughly examine the Gospels and learn how each writer uniquely depicts the life of Jesus. Paul of Tarsus wrote to the Corinthians, "Three times was I beaten with rods and once received a stoning." This course will explore what motivated Paul to have an unprecedented desire to spread the Gospel throughout the Roman Empire. Primary content is devoted to historical movements, biblical characters, and various forms of text criticism. Secondary content includes how Old Testament themes connect with the New Testament. Key skills include critical thinking skills, scope and sequence skills, periodization skills.

    Units of Study
    The Gospel of Matthew
    The Gospel of Mark
    The Gospel of Luke
    The Gospel of John
    Acts of the Apostles
    Epistles and Apocalypse
  • World Religion - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 Credit

    World Religions satisfies the religion graduation requirement.

    This course is designed as a comparative study of world religions and begins by attempting to answer "Why Religion?" Students will examine numerous civilizations and how they are influenced by religion. Ample time will be spent on history, beliefs, and how the religions of the world impact humanity today. Key skills include critical thinking skills, scope and sequence skills, periodization skills.

    Units of Study
    Origin of Religions
    Hinduism
    Buddhism
    Islam
    Judaism
    Christianity

Technology

List of 5 items.

  • Exploring Engineering - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 credit

    Exploring Engineering is designed to be a comprehensive introduction to the diverse field of engineering. This hands-on course aims to engage students in the exploration of fundamental engineering principles, problem-solving techniques and practical applications across various engineering disciplines including Mechanical, Civil, Aerospace, Electrical, Computer, and Sustainable among others. Students will investigate real-world engineering challenges through a combination of discussions, experiments, and collaborative projects. The curriculum facilitates student growth by covering key concepts such as vocabulary development, design thinking, prototyping, materials science, and basic engineering analysis. This course is ideal for the student interested in STEAM studies, or anyone with a passion for understanding how things work and why it's important for our community.


    Units of Study
    Introduction to Technology & Social Considerations
    IT Networks
    Communication Technology
    Energy & Power
    Construction Technology
    Transportation Technology
    AgriculturalTechnology
    Biomedical Technologies


  • Programming Through Game Development - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 Credit

    This course is designed as an introductory course to both programming and game development. Students will be taught elements of successful game development through coding, modeling, game design, and digital citizenship. This is a project-based course and successful students will benefit from active engagement and participation.

    Units of Study
    Block-based Programming
    Coding
    Game Design
    Game Mechanics
    Programming Languages
    Robotics
    Drones
    Circuitry
    3D Modeling
    Unity
  • Robotics - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 credit

    This course uses a hands-on approach to introduce students to the basic concepts of robotics through the construction and programming of autonomous mobile robots to accomplish challenging tasks. Students will explore physics, engineering, and physical science concepts as they assemble and program a robot. They will also explore the broad scope of robotics applications in fields such as manufacturing, security, transportation, automation, food preparation, entertainment, customer service, biomedical engineering, healthcare, agriculture, military science, space and underwater exploration, and more. Students will compete in FIRST Robotics challenges as part of the class. This class may be repeated for credit with teacher permission.

    Units of Study
    Lab Safety
    Measuring
    Tools and Tool Safety
    Machining
    Design Process
    Technical Drawing
    CAD and 3D modeling
    3D Printing
    Programming
    Wiring and Electronics
    Cabling
    Transmission and Gears
    Wheels
    Sprockets, Chains, and Belting
    Microcontrollers and Sensors
    Transmitters and Receivers
    Pneumatics
    Control Systems
    Software and Driving
    FIRST Robotics Challenge
  • Digital Videography 1 - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 Credit

    Digital Videography counts toward the Fine Arts graduation requirement.

    Digital Videography 1 introduces students to cinematography and video production through a theory-based, hands-on approach. Students will learn the history of media and media production and will be able to demonstrate competency in pre-production, production, and post-production. Students will apply problem-solving skills in planning, editing, and evaluating quality video productions. Topics include the fundamental technical aspects of the digital video camera, camera shots, angles, composition, media literacy, aesthetic elements and techniques, sound and lighting, scriptwriting, directing, and editing.

    Units of Study
    Directors
    Camera Shots and Angles
    Compositional Elements
    Camera Movements
    Editing Techniques
    Storyboarding
    Scriptwriting
    Sound Design
    Lighting
    Interviewing
    Directing
    Green Screen
  • Digital Videography 2 - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  Digital Videography 1 or teacher permission

    Digital Videography 2 counts toward the Fine Arts graduation requirement.

    Digital Videography 2 expands on what students have learned about cinematography and video production in Digital Videography 1 through a theory-based, hands-on approach. Students will learn about the history of media and media production and will be able to demonstrate competency in pre-production, production, and post production to plan, create, and evaluate quality video productions and short films. Students will explore more of the technical aspects of the digital video camera, camera shots, angles, movements, and composition, media literacy, aesthetic elements and techniques, sound and lighting, scriptwriting, directing, and editing.

    Units of Study
    Film Roles
    Camera Shots and Angles
    Compositional Elements
    Camera Movements
    Advanced Editing Techniques
    Storyboarding
    Scriptwriting
    Character Development
    Advanced Sound Design
    Advanced Lighting
    Directing
    Special Effects


Theatre

List of 4 items.

  • Elements of Theatre - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit

    Additional Fee:  Possible ticket fee if we attend performances

    Elements of Theatre is a semester course in which students are introduced to the art and craft of theatre-making and theatre performance through participatory exercises and projects in mime, theatre games, improvisation, and rudimentary scene work as well as lecture/demonstrations on basic theatre terminology, direction, design, and production. The course seeks to develop the student's knowledge and understanding of the many elements that comprise a theatrical production and to develop the ability to analyze and evaluate these elements as both participant and spectator. This work culminates with each student creating a Production Notebook of their own. In addition, students develop creativity, collaborative skills, and comfort in presenting and/or performing for others. Consistent, active engagement and participation in the exercises, scenes, and projects and respect for peers are the key components for success in the course.

    Units of Study
    Tell Me a Story
    Talking Theatre
    Theatre Practice
    Putting It Together - Theatre Making
    Improv – Fake It Until You Make It?
    Your Mind's Eyes and Ears - Production Notebook
  • Entertainment Lighting Design and Technology - Grades 10-12

    Grades 10-12
    0.5 Credit

    Prerequisite: Technical Theatre or instructor permission
    Additional Fee:  Possible ticket fee if we attend performances, events, or conferences

    Light, or its absence, plays a major role in shaping our perception of the world around us. This is especially true in the managed environments of entertainment. From theatrical productions to dance, opera, architecture, concerts, spectacles and more, the intentional manipulation of light is a cornerstone in the process shaping the spectator’s experience. This course provides students the opportunity to learn, research, analyze, and apply the properties, theories, and technologies of light and lighting in order to serve and enrich various forms of entertainment. Students will study and apply the processes of creating and implementing a lighting design and develop the artistic, collaborative, and technical skills required for the successful realization of the design. Upon completion of the core units, each student will choose a track specific to their individual interest--Design or Technology--and develop and implement their collaborative thesis project within their chosen track. 10 Practical lab hours required.

    This course may be repeated for credit with instructor permission.

    Units of Study
    Introduction to Entertainment Lighting: Storytelling & Environments
    What does what U C say 2 U?
    Qualities, Characteristics, and Functions of Light 
    Color
    Projection & Media
    Design Basics
    Design Process
    Welcome to the “Real World” - Design Application
    Don’t get ZAPPED: Electrical Theory and Practice
    Hardware: don’t BE a tool – KNOW your tools.
    But what’ll it look like? - Communicating the Design Idea
    Makin’ it REAL: Communicating the Design Realization
    Lighting Production Team: Organization and Responsibilities
    Getting Along: Collaboration
    Bits, Bytes, and Blackouts: Programming
    Just do it! Thesis Project Tracks:
    • Designer
    • Electrician
    • Programmer
  • Technical Theatre - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    .5 Credit
    Additional Fee:  Possible ticket fee if we attend performances

    This course offers students the opportunity to learn and practice the fundamental methods and skills used to technically support a theatrical performance. The class combines lecture/demonstrations with applied, hands-on labs and projects. Students will learn the basic processes and materials used in theatrical scenery construction, lighting, and sound with an emphasis on safety. Students will be instructed in, develop and demonstrate the skills required for the proper use and application of standard hand and power tools as well as a variety of common construction materials and techniques which are utilized by both theatrical technicians and DIYers. No prior skill or knowledge is needed - only an interest in basic construction and/or technical theatre and a willingness to be an active participant. This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    Telling Stories
    Safety First!
    Tech Talk
    Hammer Time! The Essential Basics
    What's' Up Doc? Telling the Technical Story Visually
    If You Build It... 
    Lights Up!
    That Sounds Good!
    Knot Now!
  • Acting - Grades 10-12

    Grades 10-12
    0.5 Credit

    Prerequisite: Elements of Theatre or instructor permission

    Additional Fee:  Possible ticket fee if we attend performances

    The Acting Class is open to those students who have demonstrated a focused interest in performance. The course is designed for the dedicated student of acting and is based on a process/workshop approach. Through a combination of readings, research, and scene work students will study and develop their acting techniques. Specifically, students will develop their skills in script analysis, line memorization, character analysis and development, monologues, and improvisation. Students are required to keep an actor's journal, participate in the performance projects and attend school productions as well as participate in post-performance critiques. A final project consisting of an in-class presentation and performance is required. Students are assessed on the honesty and consistency of their work ethic as well as their willingness to support and collaborate with their peers. "Talent" is not a factor in assessments.

    Units of Study
    To Be….or…Not….
    What a Character!
    Words, Words, Words and the Sound of Silence
    The Magic If
    Do You Hear What I Hear?
    Full of Sound and Fury…
    Go Ahead...Make a Scene

Science

List of 4 items.

  • Crime & Science - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 credit

    Required tool(s): Scientific calculator

    This course does not count toward the lab science graduation requirement.

    This course covers principles of forensic science including the justice system, crime scene investigation, and fingerprinting. Possible additional units will be arson/explosive, toxicology, hair analysis, pathology and blood spatter, and DNA. In this single-semester elective, students will learn through hands-on experience, lectures, and labs. Forensic science touches all facets of science and will help students understand the limitations of forensic science to develop their critical thinking skills.

    Success in this course will come from the motivation to explore scientific concepts and the willingness to think objectively about the evidence presented in class. This course covers sensitive materials and requires a mature attitude.

    Units of Study
    The Justice System
    Crime Scene Investigation
    Pathology
    Fingerprinting
    Hair Analysis
    Toxicology
    Blood Spatter
    DNA Analysis
    Arson/Explosive Analysis
  • Oceanography - Grades 8-10

    Grades 8-10
    0.5 credit

    This course does not count toward the lab science graduation requirement.

    Oceanography is the study of the largest and most consequential feature on earth.  This course, a single semester elective, will offer students in grades 8-10 the opportunity to use the study of oceans as a framework for practicing investigative skills including laboratory activities, environmental science fieldwork, data collection, and interpretation of findings.   The class will cover material from many branches of science including environmental science, geology, and biology.  As earth’s oceans have a tremendous effect on topics in all areas of science and society this class will offer students the opportunity to prepare for college study and careers in ocean-related history, urban planning, habitat management, resource management, aquaculture, and meteorology.

    Success in this course will come from motivation to explore scientific concepts and a willingness to work outside in the fields and forest surrounding campus.

    It is recommended that students bring in a pair of rain boots or old shoes, as the class frequently will be working outside.

    Units of Study
    Origins of the Oceans
    Sea Geography
    Properties of Water
    Ocean Currents and Tides
    Life in the Sea
    Ocean Economics
    Sand, Shells, Gravel
    International Shipping
    Fishing and Whaling 
    Monitoring Ocean Pollution
  • Science Intern - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 credit

    Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation

    This course does not count toward the lab science graduation requirement.

    This elective is designed for students in grades 9-12 with an appreciation and curiosity for the scientific method. Students will be responsible for managing and setting up lab equipment for various levels of science courses. Students will gain insight and understanding of how to conduct experiments within the different science courses. With exposure to the experimental design process and lab equipment, students would feel more prepared as lab assistants in research facilities. Students in this semester-long course will engage with the science department faculty and should have the ability to communicate effectively, be organized, and follow lab safety procedures. Those interested must receive a recommendation from a science teacher. This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    Lab Safety
    Systems of Organization
    Maintaining the Lab Space
    Independent Study Related to Science
  • Sustainable Systems: Rethink, React, Resolve - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 Credit

    This course does not count toward the lab science graduation requirement.

    This semester-long course explores and promotes the science behind a sustainable way of life. Students rethink the ways we live now, react to information about the impact of those lifestyles, and resolve to improve. Students learn what a carbon footprint is and why it matters. Do they pursue questions like what is the impact of our current agricultural system? Should we eat vegetarian? How are governments and businesses incorporating sustainability into their missions? Students in this course cultivate answers to these questions and more by working in the Trinity gardens, taking field trips, and listening to guest speakers who specialize in sustainability. This course includes multiple projects in which students research and present, allowing them to gain first-hand experience with a variety of technology and media tools. The class pursues paperless learning and helps with on-campus programming designed to support a culture of sustainability. This course may be repeated for credit with instructor permission if space permits.

    It is recommended that students bring in a pair of rain boots or old shoes, as the class frequently works in the garden or does field studies.

    Units of Study (will vary by season)
    What Does It Mean to Live Sustainably?
    Good Garden Practices
    Sustainable and Non-sustainable Food Supplies
    Sustainable Workplaces
    Sustainable Cities
    United Nations Sustainability Goals

Visual Arts

List of 11 items.

  • Design Fundamentals - Grades 8-10

    Grades 8-10
    0.5 Credit

    This course is a requirement for IB Visual Arts.

    This academic art class explores the fundamentals of two and three-dimensional works of art. Classes consist of lectures, cooperative learning experiences, and reflection and responses to art, both historical and contemporary. Students will understand different mediums and techniques used to explore the composition, expressive qualities, and intent of the artist. Formal critique writing skills evolve throughout the semester. The overall goal is for students to develop a visual vocabulary, theories, and concepts that can be applied to their own creative processes. Throughout the class, students develop their own criteria for successful art. Design Fundamentals is a prerequisite for all IB Visual Arts classes.

    Units of Study
    Art in Our World
    The Elements of Art
    The Principles of Art
    Art History
  • Drawing & Painting 1 - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit
    Required Tools:  Sketchbook

    This drawing and painting class is a semester-long studio course designed to introduce students to the basics of two-dimensional art. Students will learn the fundamental techniques of drawing and painting, beginning with drawing exercises and then progressing to painting projects using acrylics and watercolors. The class will also cover a range of subject matter including still life, landscape, and portraits. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to develop their own unique style and explore their own creativity. By the end of the course, students will have a solid foundation in the skills and techniques needed for drawing and painting and the ability to express themselves visually in a meaningful way.

    Units of Study
    The Elements Art: Define and Adopt into Art-Making Practices
    Graphite Pencil: Drawing, Shading, Highlight, Value, Linear Perspective
    Colored Pencil: Drawing, Blending, Value, Implied Texture
    Pen & Ink: Drawing, Pattern, Value
    Tempera Paint: Color Theory, Mixing, Value, Tints, Tone, Shades
    Acrylic Paint: Composition, Value, Toning, Blocking In
    Watercolor Paint: Color Making, Transparent, Opaque
    Printmaking: Lino-Cuts, Lino Prints
    Art Presentation: Exhibition, Critiques, Artist Statements
  • Drawing & Painting 2 - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit

    Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting 1 and teacher recommendation

    Required Tools:  Sketchbook

    This intermediate drawing and painting class builds upon the foundations and skills learned in Drawing & Painting 1. The semester-long studio course will focus on expanding students' technical abilities, introducing them to additional mediums, and exposing them to contemporary and historical artists to have a deeper appreciation of two-dimensional art. Through a combination of hands-on projects, critiques, and discussions, students will grow and hone their artistic abilities. By the end of the course, students will have a body of work using advanced techniques and their own artistic voice.

    Units of Study
    The Principles of Design: Define and Adopt into Art-Making Practices
    Pen & Ink: Reference Drawing, Value, Implied Texture
    Watercolor: Composition, Illustration
    Charcoal: Portraits
    Acrylic: Observational Drawing, Still Life
    Pastel: Landscape
    Art Presentation: Exhibition, Critiques, Artist Statements
  • Advanced Visual Art - 2D - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 Credit

    Prerequisites: Drawing & Painting  1 and 2, a portfolio review and teacher recommendation

    Required Tools:  Sketchbook

    The Advanced Visual Art 2D course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to continue to develop their skills and refine their craft in drawing and painting. Open to both pre-IB and non-IB students, the course emphasizes choice and freedom in the student's work, allowing them to explore and experiment with various mediums and techniques. Students will have the opportunity to work on projects that challenge and engage them while receiving guidance and feedback from the teacher. The course will provide a supportive environment where students can take ownership of their creative process and start to develop a personal style. Students will be able to work on projects of their choice, in the media and/or subject matter that interests them. By the end of the course, students will have gained a deeper understanding of their craft, honed their technical skills, and developed a strong sense of personal expression.

    This course may be repeated for credit with the permission of the teacher.

    Units of Study
    Further Practice with Various Media (Watercolor, Acrylic, Oil, Gouache, Charcoal, Graphite, Pastel)
    Inspiration from the Great Masters
    Making Individual Choices in Art
    Critiques
    Independent Exploration 
    Investigation of Encaustic, Cold Wax, and Mixed Media
    Exhibition Preparation


  • Ceramics 1 - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit
    Required Tools: Sketchbook

    This semester long course provides an overview and introduction to the fundamental processes, techniques, and practices of creating with clay. Students will learn three hand-building techniques and three wheel-thrown techniques as well as how to trim and glaze their pots. Emphasis is placed on skill development, establishing studio practices, quality craftsmanship, experimentation, creative problem-solving, and self-expression.

    Units of Study
    Hand building: Pinching, Coil building, Slab building
    Wheel Throwing: Cylinders, Bowls, Plates
    Trimming Essentials
    Glazing: Underglaze, Dip Glaze
    Exhibition: Curation, Display, Artist Statement
  • Ceramics 2 - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit

    Prerequisites: Ceramics 1 and teacher recommendation
    Required Tools: Sketchbook

    This course follows Ceramics 1 and is designed particularly for students who have a strong interest in ceramics. New techniques will be built upon the skills learned in Ceramics 1. Emphasis is placed on skill development, studio practices, quality craftsmanship, experimentation, creative problem-solving, and self-expression. Students are expected to make critical judgments of their work and challenge their creative process. Following this class, students can decide to pursue Advanced Visual Art Ceramics or IB Art.

    Units of Study
    Combination/Sculptural Forms
    Lidded Forms and Handles
    Experimentation of Surface Design: Sgraffito, Sodium Silicate, Burnishing
    Alternative Firing Techniques: Saggar, Raku, Pit-fire
    Exhibition: Curation, Display, Artist Statement
  • Advanced Visual Art - 3D - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 Credit

    Prerequisites: Ceramics 1 and 2 or Sculpture 1 and 2, a portfolio review and teacher recommendation

    Required Tools:  3-ring binder (1.5” - 2”)

    This class follows Ceramics 2 or Sculpture 2 and is designed particularly for students who have a high interest in developing their sculptural and ceramics skills and artistic voice.  It is open to both pre-IB Art students and individuals not pursuing the IB path.  New techniques will be built upon the skills learned in Ceramics 2 and Sculpture 2.  This course will be guided strongly by independent student interest. Emphasis is placed on skill development, quality craftsmanship, experimentation, creative problem-solving, and self-expression. Students are expected to make critical judgments of their work and challenge their creative process.

    This course may be repeated for credit with the permission of the teacher.

    Units of Study
    Wheel Thrown Sets/Dinnerware
    Altering Wheel-Thrown Pieces/Alternatives in Sculptural Materials
    Further Exploration of Alternative Firing Techniques/Alternative Surface Resolution in Sculpture
    Experimentation of Scale
    Further Exploration of Surface Design
    Exhibition: Curation, Display, Artist Statement


  • Photography 1 - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit

    Required Tools:  Students must supply their own digital camera with manual capabilities. Both DSLRs and non-DSLRs are acceptable. If the camera requirement presents an obstacle for enrolling in the class, accommodations may be available. Contact the photography teacher for additional information.

    This studio course provides an overview and introduction into the fundamentals of photography as fine art, balancing technical proficiency with the development of individual artistic voice expression. A digital photography platform is utilized in this introductory-level class, no prior experience is necessary. Adobe Creative Cloud, with a focus on Lightroom Classic and Photoshop, is provided to students for use on their school laptops throughout the semester and the photography lab comes equipped with individual second monitors. Following this class, students who wish to continue to the next level should enroll in Photography 2.

    Units of Study
    Digital File Management
    Manual Camera Operation
    Visual Journaling as Part of the Creative Practice
    Photo Editing and Image Manipulation
    Exploration of Various Photographic Subject Matter
    Compositional Techniques
    Natural and Artificial Lighting Techniques
    Skill-based and Personal Projects
    Large Format Print Production
    Exhibiting Artwork and Photo Finishing
    Artist Presentations


  • Photography 2 - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit

    Prerequisite: Photography 1 and teacher recommendation

    This course builds on skills learned in Photography 1 while applying them to a traditional black-and-white darkroom. In addition to furthering proficiency with the camera, lighting techniques, and photographic aesthetics, students will learn to develop 35mm film and create darkroom enlargements by hand. Working to further refine their personal style and explore photography as a creative medium, students begin to develop a body of work based on their personal interests and artistic vision. Following this class, students can decide to pursue IB Art or the Studio Workshop level. The camera and materials are provided for this course. 

    Units of Study
    Refinement of Manual Camera Skills
    Developing 35mm Film 
    Darkroom Operation and Creating Enlargements 
    Long Term Project Development
    Journaling as Part of the Creative Practice
    Critiques
    Exhibiting Artwork
    Alternative Processes
    Artist Presentations
    Artist Websites
  • Advanced Visual Art - Photography - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 Credit

    Prerequisites: Photography 1, Photography 2, a portfolio review and teacher recommendation

    Required Tools:  In addition to using their digital cameras from Photography 1, students have the option to use a 35mm camera if they wish to continue utilizing the darkroom. Options for film cameras will be discussed at the start of the class. If either of these camera requirements presents an obstacle to enrolling in the class, accommodations may be available. For additional information, speak to the photography teacher. 
    The Advanced Visual Art - Photography course is the third level on the photography path and will continue to allow students to grow and develop their skills and hone their craft. It is open to both pre-IB Art students and individuals not pursuing the IB path. This class will be highly independent with individualized instruction. There will be a thorough introduction to contemporary photographers via field trips, lectures, and visiting artists. Both analog and digital platforms will be utilized for refinement in technique and individual expression, and opportunities will be provided throughout the semester to experiment with alternative and non-traditional processes. Students are expected to make critical judgments of their own and others’ work, challenge their creative process, and continue to strengthen their work ethic.

    This course may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    Film and Digital Camera Reintroduction
    Darkroom Processes and Photoshop Reintroduction
    Mixed Media Experiments
    Concept Research
    Creative Planning
    Test Images
    Independent Project Work 
    Working Critique
    Independent Project Completion
    Art Show Preparation
    Final Critiques 
    Advanced Lighting and Lens Introduction


  • Visual Arts Intern - Grades 11-12

    Grades 11-12
    0.5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  3 semesters of Visual Arts courses:  1, 2, Studio Workshop; Application 

    This class is designed for students who want to enrich their knowledge of the management and running of an art studio. Students will be responsible for studio organization, maintenance of equipment and tools, and other medium-specific tasks. Students will gain insight and understanding of the working studio and will be prepared for studio assistant work on the college level. 

    For each semester, there will be two interns for the Ceramic Studio, and 1 each in Drawing and Painting and Photography.  Students will be chosen through an application process directed by the Visual Arts Department.

    Units of Study
    Systems of Organization for Studio Equipment & Tools
    Maintaining the Studio Space
    Best Practices in Studio Management

Interdisciplinary Electives

List of 5 items.

  • Active Trail Building - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    0.5 Credit

    Are you excited to go outside every single day?  Active Trail building is a hands-on class that explores our local campus terrain.  Students will receive the opportunity to design and build a permanent trail on the Trinity campus while learning the skills to sustainably shape our landscape to withstand the test of time.  While the focus of the class may be creating usable features, the behind-the-scenes design phase will be highlighted at the start of each class.  Students will research the defining characteristics of globally popular trails such as the Appalachian Trail and the Pacific Crest Trail in hopes of capturing their essence at our local trailhead.  Any student that takes this class should be prepared to have more fun learning than was ever thought imaginable.

    This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    Famous Trails
    Topography
    Soil
    Water
    Structures
  • Life Essentials- Grades 10-12

    0.5 Credit

    This semester-long elective is open to 10-12th graders and will focus on developing skills to be utilized both inside and outside of the classroom. It covers topics that are essential to success beyond high school. Areas covered include but are not limited to job search skills, resume and cover letter writing, interview skills, public speaking, basic etiquette, personal finance, goal-setting, personal safety, communication skills, marketing savvy, automotive maintenance, and laundry. The class will cover life skills outside of the academic curriculum that can serve students both in high school and throughout their lives.

    Students learn through a variety of lectures, class discussions, experiential learning, group projects, research, and presentations. The class uses Junior Achievement's Finance Park curriculum for the Personal Finance unit and visits the JA Finance Park at Libbie Mill Library for a day-long experiential field trip at the conclusion of the unit. The class is useful for older students as they prepare to live independently. Students must be enthusiastic participants with an interest in engaging with the class material.

    Units of Study
    Social Dynamics and Communications Styles
    Etiquette and Personal Safety
    Personal Finance
    The World of Work-Employment
    Consumer Savvy
    Insurance, Retirement, Taxes-What Fun!
    Heading Out on Your Own: Nuts, Bolts, and Automobiles
  • Sports Media & Broadcasting - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    0.5 credit

    In this course, students will be exposed to sports broadcasting and sports media in several forms. We will investigate the skills needed for play-by-play announcing across a variety of sports, color commentary, interviewing, podcasting, and social media. Students will also work on behind-the-scenes facets of broadcasting such as production, statistics, and graphics. Students will work collaboratively on real-world athletic contests in Trinity's own broadcasting network (TESPN). Guest speakers from the world of broadcasting will teach students about real-world experiences in the field. Students with an interest in a career in broadcasting or communications (in front of and/or behind the camera) will practice and hone skills in those areas. Students who accept constructive criticism and are not afraid to be a public voice will thrive in this course.

    Units of Study
    Introduction to Play-by-Play Announcing
    Introduction to Color Commentary
    The Art of the Interview
    Podcasting
    Production of Live Sports
    Play By Play Announcing (Finding your Style)
    Color Commentary (Finding your Style)
    Statistics in Broadcasting
  • Sports and Society - Grades 10-12

    0.5 Credit

    Whether you are an athlete, a sports fan, or both, you've come to the right course! Sports and Society will focus on the enormous impact sports has played--and continues to play--in society, with an emphasis on U.S. society. Students will explore issues of race, gender, economics, and politics in relation to sports. Current topics in the news will be discussed and analyzed in a vibrant, respectful community of learners. Students will be expected to participate in a variety of activities including weekly seminar discussions, research projects, and group activities. This class is designed to improve students’ critical thinking, discussion, research, and writing skills in preparation for college.

    Units of Study
    Youth and College Sports
    Ethics in Sports
    Discrimination in Sports
    The Business of Sports
  • Psychology - Grade 12

    Grade 12
    1 Credit

    This course is designed to give students a general idea of what psychology is, how information is developed, what we have learned about ourselves, and how psychology is applied to help improve people’s lives. Students learn through focused readings and class discussions as well as through interpreting scientific data and observations. Skills in critical analysis, observation, research, and writing are all emphasized. This course is a year-long elective for senior students. This course is a solid foundation for students enrolling in a psychology 101 course in college. Students should be open-minded and curious about human behavior. Organized and independent learners will be successful in this class.

    Units of Study
    Psychology’s Roots, Big Ideas, and Critical Thinking Tools
    Neuroscience and Consciousness
    Developing Through the Life Span
    Gender and Sexuality
    Sensation and Perception
    Learning
    Memory
    Thinking, Language and Intelligence
    Motivation and Emotion
    Stress, Health, and Human Flourishing
    Personality
    Psychological Disorders
    Therapy
    Social Psychology