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Course Description Guide 2019-20

Performing Arts (2019-20)

The Performing Arts program at Trinity builds confidence in self-expression, develops the creative process and cultivates an appreciation of the human experience. Performing Arts courses ask students to examine the nature of creativity, the development of both onstage and supporting position skills and techniques unique to both musical and theatrical performance. The curriculum is designed to meet the needs of all students, with entry-level courses in music and theater for those who want to start their exploration to sequentially more advanced offerings, for those who wish to pursue a more in-depth study (including courses for students considering a potential career in the performing arts).

One year-long or two semester courses are required. Scroll down for course sequence.

Music

List of 11 items.

  • Listen Up! Music Fundamentals - Grades 8-12


    This 1-semester course explores the essence of what music is, how it's created and its uses in cultures throughout the world. Students will gain an understanding of the core elements in music: melody, rhythm, harmony, texture and timbre and learn how these are manipulated for artistic effect in a variety of musical styles. (Classical, Popular and World music) Students will learn to accurately identify musical aspects through focused listening and also acquire a familiarity with basic musical notation. (note and rhythm reading, scale and chord construction/identification, terms) In addition, the connections between music and its origin society/culture will be studied. Students learn through listening to a wide variety of music, with discussion and analysis of musical elements. They will learn to use music software including Garage Band and Sibelius to further understand and notate musical concepts.

    Units of Study
    Rhythm
    Melody
    Harmony
    Music In Society
    Piano Keyboard
    Style and Form

     
  • Preparatory Band - Grades 8-11

    . 5 Credit
    Required Tools:  Once an instrument choice has been made, students will need to rent or buy that instrument from area stores (except for tuba)

    This course develops the fundamentals of playing a school band instrument. (brass, woodwind or percussion) Additionally, essential elements of music theory will also be explored. Students learn by playing as well as class discussion and analysis of musical selections. Students concurrently gain technique and musical knowledge, learn how to assess their playing, develop effective practice habits and build musical independence and confidence. This class is open to all students, especially those that would like to eventually play in the school's Pep, Concert and Jazz bands. The main factors for student success in this course are some determination and a willingness to practice consistently. There are several performance opportunities throughout the year. Students that wish to play in the Advanced Band (including Pep Band) the following year, should enroll in this class for both semesters. (total of 1 credit)

    Units of Study
    Fundamentals: Instrument Assembly, Sound Production and Maintenance
    We're Underway: Initial Notes, Rhythms and Terms 1
    How to Practice, the Effective and Fun Way
    Listening All Around: Playing in a Group
    Rhythmic Subdivision 1: 8th Notes and Rests
    Creating Musical Drama: Articulations and Dynamics
    Playing in 2/4 and 3/4 Time
    Musical Patterns: Bb, F, Eb, Ab, Db and C Major Scales
    Intermediate Notes (ranging beyond 1 octave), Rhythms and Terms 2
    Musical Flow: Structural Symbols
    Performances! (December, March and *May) * play w/Advanced Band for some numbers
    Dotted Quarter and Dotted 8th Notes
    Syncopation
    Advanced Notes (functional range for Advanced Band), Rhythms and Terms 3
    Musical Pattern: The Chromatic Scale
    Rhythmic Subdivision 2: 16th Notes and Rests
    Playing in 2/2 and 6/8 Time
  • Advanced Band - Grades 8-12

    1 Credit
    Prerequisite:  At least 2 years of playing experience in a supervised setting (school ensemble or private lessons) OR completion of the Preparatory Band course with at least a 'B' grade and teacher recommendation. The student MUST be able to read music well; if her/his music reading ability is not secure, then the best course choice is Preparatory Band. Percussionists should have at least basic familiarity of and playing skills on mallet instruments. Any student that reads music well but with less than the required experience needs to see the director for a playing assessment before enrolling in this course.

    Required Tools:  Students must have their own instrument with the exception of the following: tuba, bassoon, oboe, baritone sax, bass clarinet. Percussionists should own a snare drum or drum set and a bell set or keyboard/piano. Students need to purchase the "Tuning CD" and a metronome (any type is OK). These are one-time purchases that can be used in successive years.

    This course is designed to further develop each student's playing technique, musicianship (theory, concepts, terms) and to employ these in creating artful performances. A wide variety of musical styles are performed each year. Students learn by playing in each rehearsal as well as class discussion and analysis via critical listening of musical passages during rehearsals. Students learn to assess their own playing, create and implement effective practice habits to refine their skills based upon the requirements of the music and work toward becoming independent and proficient musicians. This class is for musicians that enjoy the challenge of playing a wide range of music. This course is especially useful for any student wishing to pursue a career in music or that would like to build substantial musical skills that they can continue to enjoy in their post-school lives. The key qualities for students to be successful in this course are having enthusiasm, strong focus during rehearsals, consistent and effective practice habits and a desire to be a productive contributor to an ensemble that seeks musical excellence. All band students perform for several school concerts per year as well as have the opportunity to play in the Trinity Pep Band, which performs for numerous sporting events during the fall and winter sports seasons. Additional experiences such as participation in various ensembles (jazz ensemble, district, all-state honors bands) are available to interested students who meet the qualifying criteria. This class may be repeated for credit with teacher recommendation.

    Units of Study
    Individual Musicianship: Determining What the Music Tells You to Work Upon
    Effective Practice: Planning and Implementation
    Ensemble Musicianship: Critical Listening to the Music, Group and Your Roles
    Developing Artistry: Tone, Intonation, Articulation, Phrasing, Dynamic Shading
    Musical Independence and Leadership
    Popular Music Styles and Performances: 1st Semester
    Concert Band Music Styles and Performances: 2nd Semester
    Cabaret! Annual Theme Show (November or January)
    Holiday Concert (December)
    Spring Concert (March)
    Final Concert (May Fine Arts Festival)
     
  • Chorus - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit

    This elective course is designed to further develop each student's singing proficiency, enhance general musicianship (theory, concepts, terms) and grow as a more artistic performer. Students will have the opportunity to perform in several school concerts during the year. A variety of musical styles will be explored. Students learn through listening and responding, performing, singing in small groups and large ensembles, and performing mock-auditions.  Any student, regardless of previous experience, can be successful in this class by participating fully and being willing to learn new musical skills. Additional experiences such as participation in select ensembles (District and All-State Chorus) are available to interested students who meet the qualifying criteria. This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    General Musicianship
    Solfege
    Rhythms
    Music Theory
    Languages
    Performance and Practice Skills
    Cabaret! Theme Show
    Winter Fine Arts Festival
    Spring Concert
    Spring Fine Arts Festival
  • Preparatory Strings - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Required Tools:  Students must have their own instrument. Several area stores rent/sell string instruments.

    This elective course is designed for students with no experience with a stringed instrument as well as those students who have limited experience and need additional instruction to be prepared for the Orchestra class. This course will introduce the fundamentals of string playing and musicianship, including basic music theory, history and note reading.  Students learn through listening and responding, participating fully during class and with regular practice time outside of class. Additional experiences such as participation in select ensembles (District and Regional Orchestras) are available to interested students who meet the qualifying criteria. This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    General Musicianship Skills
    Ensemble Playing Skills
    Stringed Instrument Knowledge and Care
    Music Theory
    Tone Production and Intonation
    Cabaret! Theme Show
    Winter Fine Arts Festival
    Spring Concert
    Spring Fine Arts Festival
  • Orchestra - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  At least 2 years of playing experience in a supervised setting (school ensemble or private lessons)  
    Required Tools:  Students must have their own instrument. Several area stores rent/sell string instruments.

    This elective course is designed to further develop each student's playing proficiency, enhance their general musicianship (theory, concepts, terms) and become more artistic performers. Students will have the opportunity to perform in several school concerts during the year.  Students learn through listening and responding, participating fully during class and regularly practicing outside of class. A variety of musical styles will be explored. Additional experiences such as participation in select ensembles (Central Regional and Senior Regional Orchestra, All-State Orchestra) are available to interested students who meet the qualifying criteria. This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    General Musicianship
    Ensemble Playing Skills
    Practice Skills
    Performance Skills
    Music Theory
    Stringed Instrument Care and Maintenance
    Cabaret! Theme Show
    Winter Fine Arts Festival
    Spring Concert
    Spring Fine Arts Festival
  • Studio Music Production - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  Any other Trinity music course with at least a 'B' grade or passing score on Music Skills assessment

    This course investigates the musical (creating good song flow, solid bass lines and chord progressions, singable melody) and technical (proper recording levels, mic choices and placement, effects such as EQ and compression, creating engaging mixes) aspects currently used in creating popular music. Students learn by critical listening to sample professional and student projects, active discussion of the topics being explored, and then application of these principles within their own audio projects. The bulk of class time is spent working on the audio projects. Students will learn how to create songs that have solid musical construction and professional production values as well as analyzing these facets in works of artists that they listen to. This class is for student musicians that wish to improve their song-writing and production skills, particularly those that are considering a career in any musical media field. Students need to be inquisitive and open to listening to and drawing ideas from successful music in a variety of styles, not just those that are their favorites. Additionally, students taking this course need a solid sense of discipline to apply the principles that are learned and be able to remain on task when working independently. This class may be repeated for credit with instructor recommendation.

    Units of Study (Original Course)
    Studio Basics: Hardware and Software
    Song Structure 1: Bass and Drums
    Song Structure 2: Major/Minor Scales and Chord Progressions
    Melody Writing
    Microphones: Types and Placement Techniques
    Effects 1: EQ and Compression
    Effects 2: Reverb, Delay and Other Time-based Effects
    Creating Dynamic and Engaging Mixes
    Independent Projects

    Units of Study (Supplementary Topics if course is repeated)
    Mastering and Distribution
    'Cover' Projects
    Lyric Writing
    Horn and String Section Writing
    Independent Projects
    Stereo and Other Multiple Mic Techniques
    Video Game Scoring
    Jingle Writing
    Outboard Effects Processing
    TV and Film Scoring
    Creating an Audio Portfolio
  • Guitar 1 - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Required Tools:  Students will need a functional Acoustic guitar for class. Ideally, they will provide their own instrument but there are a limited quantity of school instruments that may be checked out to a student for the semester if necessary. All students will also need a 1.5" 3 ring binder, an electronic tuner (preferably the clip-on type), 6 or more picks, 2 sets of extra strings for their style of guitar, and a capo. If a student borrows a school instrument, they will need to acquire these other materials and bring them to class.

    Guitar 1 investigates the universal language of music and how to express it with six strings. Beginning with rudimentary skills, the class works towards a solid understanding of both the instrument and basic music fundamentals. Students will learn about the elements of melody, rhythm, and harmony through an extensive variety of popular songs and other exercises.  In class, students will learn through interactive lessons and activities while playing songs together in a fun group environment. Students are also expected to use supplemental resources posted to Google Classroom and instructor’s website to continue learning and effectively practice what is taught in class. This is not a performance based class but students will be required to perform together once in the semesterly Fine Arts Festival.

    This class is appropriate for both aspiring players with absolutely no experience as well as guitarists who have experience but lack a strong comprehension of fundamental music skills. (Enrollment in Guitar 2 is contingent upon either completing this class or demonstrating proficiency in the skills covered by interview with the instructor)   Preparation, participation, focus, and respect is important for learning in a group setting and out of class, a routine of effective practice is imperative for improving skills.
     
    Units of Study
    Understanding Music as a Universal Language
    Instrumental Voices and Why the Guitar is Awesome!
    Transitioning from Enjoying Music to Playing It…
    What You Need to Know about Your Guitar and How to Use It
    Understanding, Speaking, and Reading Pitch as a Guitarist.
    Melody, Riffs, and Phrasing Musical Ideas as Conversation
    The Process of Progress: Effectively Learning and Practicing
    Comprehending, Reading, and Applying Rhythm as a Guitarist
    Building Harmony and Chord Shapes in the “Open Position”
    Chord Progressions, following Song Structure, and Common Strum Patterns
    Playing Songs in Different Styles/Genres using Similar Groups of Chord Shapes as an Application of Skills
    The Capo, How To Use It, and Making Difficult Songs Easy
    Pick Patterns, Basic Finger-Style, and Additional Techniques
    Preparing for and Performing as an Ensemble (December/May Fine Arts Concert)
    Life after Guitar 1
  • Guitar 2 - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  Guitar 1 and/or teacher recommendation
    Required Tools:   Students will need a functional Acoustic Guitar, a 1.5" binder dedicated to the class, an electronic tuner, 2 extra sets of strings appropriate to their style of guitar, 6 or more picks, and a Capo.

    Guitar 2 is intended for competent intermediate and advancing guitarists with a functional understanding of the material covered in Guitar 1. Students will move beyond the open position and delve into bar chord shapes, extended chords, building major and minor scales, relationships between chords and key, arpeggios, lead technique, improvising, and other areas of fretboard knowledge. This is not a performance based class, but students will be required to perform together once in the semesterly Fine Arts Festival.
    Building on the fundamentals acquired in Guitar 1, this course continues to investigate understanding the diverse language of music and how it can be expressed with the instrument. Students will learn to build their vocabulary by unlocking the fretboard and delve into more advanced skills, styles, and techniques as well as music theory applied through a broad range of songs.  In class, students will learn through interactive lessons, lecture, activities and playing songs together in a fun group environment. Students are also expected to use supplemental resources posted to google classroom and instructor’s website to continue learning and effectively practice what is taught in class.

    This course is intended for competent intermediate and advancing guitarists with a functional understanding of the material covered in Guitar 1 and a desire to learn more. Enrollment is contingent upon either completing Guitar 1 this or demonstrating proficiency in the skills covered by interview with the instructor.

    Guitar 2 prepares students for a more informed pursuit of their musical interests and to take other departmental classes such as Guitar 3, Studio Music Production. It also puts students on track to take IB Music or CoLAB if they aspire to do so.  With increasingly complex material, the importance of engagement , focus during class and routine use of resources for effective out of class practice become even more imperative.

    Units of Study
    Leaving the Open Position with “Floating” Chord Shapes
    Unlocking the Fretboard and Playing Melodically Beyond the 5th Fret.
    Introduction to Major Scale Theory, Key Signatures, Intervals, and Building
    The Circle of 5ths and Why It is Useful
    Introduction to and Application of Basic “Closed” Barre Chord Shapes
    Extended Harmony, Evolving Chord Shapes, and Arpeggios
    Introduction to and Application of Major Pentatonic Scales
    Relative Minor Scales, Natural Minor Scales, and Building Harmony in minor Keys
    Introduction to and Application of Minor Pentatonic Scales
    Expression and Additional Techniques
    Introduction to Improvisation and Innovation
    Critical Listening Development
    Appreciation of the History and Evolution of the Guitar in Popular Music
    Preparing for and Performing as an Ensemble (December/May Fine Arts Concert)
    Life After Guitar 2
  • Guitar 3 - Grades 9-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisites:  Guitar 2 and Instructor Approval. This class may be repeated for credit with approval of Instructor as specific content taught varies each semester.
    Required Tools:  Students will need a functional Acoustic Guitar, a 1.5" binder dedicated to the class, an electronic tuner, 2 extra sets of strings appropriate to their style of guitar, 6 or more picks, a Capo, and a Guitar Strap.

    Continuing to grow from the knowledge, theory, and skills learned in previous courses, Guitar 3 moves towards exploration of instrumental communication on an advanced level through in-depth study of songs, playing styles, and influential musicians in the evolution of sonic culture. Specific songs and application of content rotates from year to year but students will continue to develop melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic skills, connecting chord and scale theory with playing techniques to build a stronger musical vocabulary.

    In class, students will learn through interactive lessons, lectures, and activities and by playing songs together in a fun group environment. Students are also expected to use supplemental resources posted to google classroom and instructor’s website to continue learning and effectively practice what is taught in class.  Guitar 3 prepares students for serious pursuit of musical interests beyond the classroom and opens the door for them to take either IB Music or CoLAB with approval from the instructor. Motivated learning, engagement and focus during class as well as routine use of resources for effective out of-class practice are crucial.

    Units of Study
    Review of Knowledge and Skills Expected to Be Known
    Recognizing Similarities and Differences Between Songs by Key
    Engaging I-IV-V Chord Progressions, Variations, and Riffs
    Songs by Notable Guitarists
    Stylistic Explorations
    Drop and Alternate Tunings, Partial Capo Techniques
    Improvising
    Fingerpicking
  • Collaborative Music Studies - Grades 11-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  Guitar 3 and/or demonstrates satisfactory proficiency with primary instrument to Head of Department.  Repeat enrollment in this class is possible at the discretion of Instructor.
    Required Tools:  Students are expected to provide their own primary instrument.

    CoLAB is about investigating the possibilities of what can be done with 12 notes, building confidence, practical skills and learning to navigate the experience of musical collaboration in a safe, structured, and supportive environment.  Student’s learn experientially by playing and exploring structured songs together, exercises designed to develop and apply practical skills, experimenting with instruments from the school’s collection, workshops and demonstrations by guest artists, using laptops in conjunction with studio resources to record and grow ideas, working towards the ultimate goal of performing together in a live setting.

    This class is appropriate for serious musicians who have achieved a strong level of technical proficiency on their instrument and are interested in developing practical collaborative skills working together with other musicians.

    Units of Study
    -What Are We Playing?: Jamming, Instigating Collaboration and Finding Common Ground in the Vast Potential of 12 Notes.
    The Art of Conversation: Leading, Following, and Dropping into Uncharted Musical Territory
    Getting it Together: Common Challenges and Pitfalls of Working with Musicians and How to Manage Them
    Bringing Songs to the Table, Building a Repertoire, and the Importance of Structure
    Improvising: Listening, Responding, and Learning to Take Risks with Confidence.
    Sonic Diversity and Developing Versatility from the Familiar
    Exploring the Un-familiar...Vocals and Other Instruments
    The Creative Cycle: Imitation, Inspiration, and Innovation
    Developing Ideas, Demos, and Studio Recording
    Gigging: Preparing, Rehearsing, and Doing it Live

Theatre

List of 3 items.

  • Elements of Theatre - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Additional Fee:  Possible ticket fee if we attend performances
    Elements of Theatre is a semester course in which students are introduced to the art and craft of theatre making and theatre performance through participatory exercises and projects in mime, theatre games, improvisation, and rudimentary scene work as well as lecture/demonstrations on basic theatre terminology, direction, design and production. The course seeks to develop the student's knowledge and understanding of the many elements that comprise a theatrical production and to develop the ability to analyze and evaluate these elements as both participant and spectator. This work culminates with each student creating a Production Notebook of their own. In addition, student's develop creativity, collaborative skills and comfort in presenting and/or performing for others. Consistent, active engagement and participation in the exercises, scenes and projects and respect for peers are the key components for success in the course.

    Units of Study
    Tell Me a Story
    Talking Theatre
    Theatre Practice
    Putting It Together - Theatre Making
    Improv – Fake It Until You Make It?
    Your Mind's Eyes and Ears - Production Notebook
  • Technical Theatre - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit

    This course offers students the opportunity to learn and practice the fundamental methods and skills used to technically support a theatrical performance. The class combines lecture/demonstrations with applied, hands-on labs and projects. Students will learn the basic processes and materials used in theatrical scenery construction, lighting and sound with an emphasis on safety. Students will be instructed in, develop and demonstrate the skills required for the proper use and application of standard hand and power tools as well as a variety of common construction materials and techniques which are utilized by both theatrical technicians and DIYers. No prior skill or knowledge is needed - only an interest in basic construction and/or technical theatre and a willingness to be an active participant. This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    Telling Stories
    Safety First!
    Tech Talk
    Hammer Time! The Essential Basics
    What's' Up Doc? Telling the Technical Story Visually
    If You Build It....
    Lights Up!
    That Sounds Good!
    Knot Now!
  • Acting - Grades 10-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite: Elements of Theatre or instructor permission
    Additional Fee:  Possible ticket fee if we attend performances

    The Acting class is open to those students who have demonstrated a focused interest in performance. The course is designed for the dedicated student of acting and is based on a process/workshop approach. Through a combination of readings, research and scene work students will study and develop their acting technique. Specifically, students will develop their skills in script analysis, line memorization, character analysis and development, monologues and improvisation. Students are required to keep an actor's journal, participate in the performance projects and attend school productions as well as participate in post-performance critiques. A final project consisting of an in-class presentation and performance is required. Students are assessed on the honesty and consistency of their work ethic as well as their willingness to support and collaborate with their peers. "Talent" is not a factor in assessment.

    Units of Study
    To Be….or…Not….
    What a Character!
    Words, Words, Words and the Sound of Silence
    The Magic If
    Do You Hear What I Hear?
    Full of Sound and Fury…
    Go Ahead...Make a Scene

IB Music

List of 2 items.

  • IB Music - Grade 11

    1 Credit
    Prerequisites:  Satisfactory score on a music skills placement test and teacher permission
    Required Tools:  Instrumentalists must have their own instrument at home with the exception of percussionists, who should have the core instruments (snare and bells) at home but can use the school's percussion inventory to diversify their recital program.
    Additional Fee:  Though not a school fee, private music lessons on a student's primary instrument or voice must be taken through the senior year recital in late March. IB examination fees will be incurred the second year of the course.
    This is the first year of a two-year course that explores comprehensive musicianship: music theory, music history, knowledge of music from various cultures around the world, performance and compositional practices. This course prepares students for the IB Music Examination.

    Students learn by frequent critical listening and analysis of works drawn from Western Art ("Classical"), World and Popular musics. Student musicians perform regularly in front of their peers and the instructor to gain experience and receive feedback. Composing is undertaken in conjunction with applicable music theory areas, starting with short exercises and building to writing full sections by year's end.

    This course is a year-long elective for juniors. Students who would like to develop their musical skills to a high level, especially those who are considering a career in any music-related field should take this course. Key skills are the ability to listen critically and express findings from analysis (both in class discussion and in writing) and to work both independently and in collaboration with peers. It is important that students approach all studied music with an open mind and to seek to understand both the emotional and intellectual aspects that are present in all well-crafted musical works.

    Students must take private instruction with a qualified instructor on her/his instrument or voice through the senior year recital in late March. Interested students should contact the instructor to arrange for an inventory of musical concepts no later than the end of their freshman year.

    Units of Study
    The Elements of Music: Melody, Rhythm, Harmony, Texture, Dynamics, Articulation, Timbre
    Musical Organization: Structure and Forms
    Theory: Key Signatures, Scales, Intervals, Triads, Dominant and Diminished 7th Chords
    Renaissance Vocal Music
    Renaissance Instrumental Music
    The Analysis Process: Structure, Elements, Terminology, Context
    Baroque Vocal Music
    Baroque Instrumental Music
    Classical Form: The Sonata Cycle
    Classical Chamber Music
    Classical Symphony: Symphony No. 94 by Haydn (Prescribed Work #1)
    World Music: Indonesia, the Andes, North America, Africa, the Middle East
    Performance Presentations 1 and 2
    Composition: Voice-leading and Redistribution, Functional Chord Progressions, Melody Construction, Melody-Harmony Agreement, Accompaniment Writing, Tonicization/Modulation, Sectional Coherence
  • IB Music HL/SL - Grade 12

    1 Credit
    Prerequisite:  Teacher recommendation based on the expectation of B or higher in IB Music
    Required Tools:  Instrumentalists must have their own instrument at home with the exception of percussionists, who should have the core instruments (snare and bells) at home but can use the school's percussion inventory to diversify their recital program.
    Additional Fee:  Though not a school fee, private music lessons on a student's primary instrument or voice must be taken through the senior year recital in late March. Students in this course are expected to take the IB exam. A fee applies to all students taking this exam.
    This is the final year of a two-year course that explores comprehensive musicianship: music theory, music history, knowledge of music from various cultures around the world, performance and compositional practices. This course prepares students for the IB Music Examination.(both HL and SL)  The teacher and student will determine examination level based on personal strength, interests, and needs of the student.

    Students learn by frequent critical listening and analysis of works drawn from Western Art ("Classical"), World and Popular musics. Student musicians perform regularly in front of their peers and the instructor to gain experience and receive feedback. Composing is undertaken in conjunction with applicable music theory areas, starting with short exercises and building to writing full works by the IB submission dates in early April.

    Students registered at the Higher Level will perform a 20-minute recital AND submit a composition portfolio of 3 works. Students registered at the Standard Level will EITHER perform a 15-minute recital OR submit a composition portfolio of 2 works. All students undertake an independent research project, the Musical Links Investigation, as well as take the IB Music exam.

    This course is a year-long elective for seniors. Students who would like to develop their musical skills to a very high level, especially those who are considering a career in any music-related field should take this course. Key skills are the ability to listen critically and express findings from analysis (both in class discussion and in writing) and to work both independently and in collaboration with peers. It is important that students approach all studied music with an open mind and to seek to understand both the emotional and intellectual aspects that are present in all well-crafted musical works. Additionally, looking forward to the assignment timeline and employing time-management skills are especially valuable in the project-heavy time period of February-April.

    Students must take private instruction with a qualified instructor on her/his instrument or voice through the senior year recital in late March.

    Units of Study
    Classical Opera
    Theory: 7th Chords Other than Dominant/Diminished, Extended Chords (9ths, 11ths, 13ths), Chord Clusters, Quartal/Quintal Chords, 12-Tone System, Altered Note Chords
    Romantic Chamber Music
    Romantic Larger Forms: Rachmaninoff "Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini"(Prescribed work #2)
    Romantic Opera
    Impressionistic Music
    Modern Era Instrumental Music: Chamber and Larger Forms
    Modern Era Vocal Music
    Jazz
    Electronic and Mixed Media Music
    Minimalistic Music
    World Music: India, the Far East, Eastern Europe, the British Isles, Brazil/Argentina, the Caribbean
    Cultural Comparisons: The Musical Links Investigation (Independent Research Project)
    In-class Performances 3-5 (Recital Preparation)
    Composition: Art-Song Accompaniment (Stylistic Study 1), Romantic Writing Concepts, Planing, Impressionistic Writing, 12-Tone Writing (Stylistic Study 2), Polytonal Writing, Jazz and Popular Song Writing

Course Sequence

Music

Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4
Preparatory Band Advanced Band IB Music IB Music SL/HL
Preparatory Strings Orchestra IB Music IB Music SL/HL
Guitar 1 Guitar 2 Guitar 3 Collaborative Music Studies
Chorus
Music Fundamentals Studio Music Production


Theatre

Grades 8-12 Grades 8-12 Grades 10-12
Elements of Theatre Technical Theatre Acting