Academics
Departments & Curriculum
Course Description Guide 2019-20

Electives (2019-20)

All courses beyond the minimum graduation requirements are considered elective credits. Yearlong and semester classes designated as elective courses are intended to supplement a student’s regular program. This page represents the most commonly selected electives, but may not be exhaustive. Some year-long courses from other departments may qualify as electives.

English

List of 3 items.

  • Communication and Public Speaking - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    .5 Credit

    In this course, students will study and practice the art of public speaking. To prepare for and understand a variety of speeches, students will listen to famous speeches and learn from their voices, postures, mannerisms, and presentations. In seeing professionals (as well as amateurs) at work, students will have an understanding of the physical, emotional, academic, and technological challenges that all speakers face. Each day, students will participate in individual and group games and exercises that will build up their stage presence and confidence as speakers. From there, students will begin to consider their own opinions as possible speech topics. As they write, organize, and practice their speeches, students will receive constant individual and peer feedback. Throughout the course, students will reflect on their growth as speakers and listeners. Students who are interested in polishing their public speaking skills for class presentations as well as their involvement in extracurriculars would benefit from this hands-on course.

    Units of Study
    Beginning Communication
    Introduction Speech
    Pet Peeve Speech
    Effective Presentations
    Demonstration Speech
    Sales Pitch
    Motivational Speech
    Graduation Speech
  • Creative Writing - Grades 8-12

    Grades 8-12
    .5 credit

    Creative Writing offers an introduction to fiction writing in a collaborative, relaxed atmosphere. Short stories are read and discussed that model basic elements such as description, dialogue, action and plot. Students learn and grow as writers both by writing but also through the elements of peer review, workshop and revision. Individual pieces are revised and changed and then re-submitted in a final portfolio at the end of each quarter.  This semester elective can be taken more than once for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    Description
    Dialogue
    Plot
    Revision
    Story Arcs and Planning
  • Rock & Roll Lit - Grades 9-12

    Grades 9-12
    .5 credit
    Prerequisite: None

    In this course, students will study the history and literature of Rock and Roll from the bluesmen of the 1920’s through the indie rock movement of the early 2000’s. Students will read short stories, rock criticism, and excerpts from well-known biographies and autobiographies, while maintaining a focus on the close-reading of song lyrics. Students will develop an appreciation for active listening, perform close-readings regularly, write album reviews, and perform and present research and analysis on artists or movements of their choosing. This is a semester-long elective for students in grades 9-12--especially those with particular interest in rock and roll music and/or poetry analysis.

    Units of Study
    The Blues
    Rock and Roll Pioneers
    The Beatles
    Love Songs
    Protest Songs
    Sad Songs--Alienation, Depression, Isolation, Addiction, Death
    Existentialism and Religion: Why are we here? What’s all this for?
    Pastoral Songs
    Teen Angst
    Narratives

AP Math Electives

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  • AP Statistics - Grades 10-12

    1 Credit
    Prerequisites: Algebra 2 or Algebra 2 Honors with a grade of B or higher and English grade of B or higher
    Required Tools: TI-84 Plus Series calculator
    Additional Fee: Students in this course are expected to take the AP exam.  A fee applies to all students taking this exam.

    This course closely follows the recommendations of the Committee on Statistics of the Advanced Placement Program. While the class is in the mathematics department, 99% of computation is done on the calculator. The class emphasizes discussion of these calculations and the meaning of the numbers. Most learning is done through traditional lectures with practice problem homework assignments. Activities and experiments are done for demonstration of concepts where appropriate and time permitting.  A successful student will have strong reading comprehension and good number sense.

    Units of Study
    Displaying Data
    Modeling Distributions
    Least Squares Regression
    Designing Studies
    Probability
    Random Variables
    Sampling Distributions
    One Sample Confidence Intervals
    One Sample Hypothesis Tests
    Comparing Two Populations or Groups
    Chi-Squared Tests
    Regression Inference and Transformations
  • Introduction to Statistics - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit
    Prerequisite: Algebra 2/Trigonometry
    Required Tools: TI-84 Plus Series calculator

    Introduction to Statistics is a course designed to give students a feel for what the course of statistics is about and give them a strong foundation for any college level introductory statistics course. Most learning is done through traditional lectures with practice problem homework assignments. Hands-on activities and experiments will be done to demonstrate certain topics as time permits. Memorization of formulas and definitions is not required. Students may use notecards on tests and quizzes.  This course is excellent preparation for students with an interest in business, science, education, law, computer science, and related fields.

    Units of Study
    An Introduction to Statistics
    Describing Data Using Graphs and Tables
    Describing Data Numerically
    Describing the Relationship Between Two Variables
    Probability
    Random Variables
    Sampling Distributions
    One Sample Confidence Intervals
    Hypothesis Testing
    Two Sample Inference Methods
    Chi-Squared Tests and Regression Inference

Music

List of 11 items.

  • Listen Up! Music Fundamentals - Grades 8-12


    This 1-semester course explores the essence of what music is, how it's created and its uses in cultures throughout the world. Students will gain an understanding of the core elements in music: melody, rhythm, harmony, texture and timbre and learn how these are manipulated for artistic effect in a variety of musical styles. (Classical, Popular and World music) Students will learn to accurately identify musical aspects through focused listening and also acquire a familiarity with basic musical notation. (note and rhythm reading, scale and chord construction/identification, terms) In addition, the connections between music and its origin society/culture will be studied. Students learn through listening to a wide variety of music, with discussion and analysis of musical elements. They will learn to use music software including Garage Band and Sibelius to further understand and notate musical concepts.

    Units of Study
    Rhythm
    Melody
    Harmony
    Music In Society
    Piano Keyboard
    Style and Form

     
  • Preparatory Band - Grades 8-11

    . 5 Credit
    Required Tools:  Once an instrument choice has been made, students will need to rent or buy that instrument from area stores (except for tuba)

    This course develops the fundamentals of playing a school band instrument. (brass, woodwind or percussion) Additionally, essential elements of music theory will also be explored. Students learn by playing as well as class discussion and analysis of musical selections. Students concurrently gain technique and musical knowledge, learn how to assess their playing, develop effective practice habits and build musical independence and confidence. This class is open to all students, especially those that would like to eventually play in the school's Pep, Concert and Jazz bands. The main factors for student success in this course are some determination and a willingness to practice consistently. There are several performance opportunities throughout the year. Students that wish to play in the Advanced Band (including Pep Band) the following year, should enroll in this class for both semesters. (total of 1 credit)

    Units of Study
    Fundamentals: Instrument Assembly, Sound Production and Maintenance
    We're Underway: Initial Notes, Rhythms and Terms 1
    How to Practice, the Effective and Fun Way
    Listening All Around: Playing in a Group
    Rhythmic Subdivision 1: 8th Notes and Rests
    Creating Musical Drama: Articulations and Dynamics
    Playing in 2/4 and 3/4 Time
    Musical Patterns: Bb, F, Eb, Ab, Db and C Major Scales
    Intermediate Notes (ranging beyond 1 octave), Rhythms and Terms 2
    Musical Flow: Structural Symbols
    Performances! (December, March and *May) * play w/Advanced Band for some numbers
    Dotted Quarter and Dotted 8th Notes
    Syncopation
    Advanced Notes (functional range for Advanced Band), Rhythms and Terms 3
    Musical Pattern: The Chromatic Scale
    Rhythmic Subdivision 2: 16th Notes and Rests
    Playing in 2/2 and 6/8 Time
  • Advanced Band - Grades 8-12

    1 Credit
    Prerequisite:  At least 2 years of playing experience in a supervised setting (school ensemble or private lessons) OR completion of the Preparatory Band course with at least a 'B' grade and teacher recommendation. The student MUST be able to read music well; if her/his music reading ability is not secure, then the best course choice is Preparatory Band. Percussionists should have at least basic familiarity of and playing skills on mallet instruments. Any student that reads music well but with less than the required experience needs to see the director for a playing assessment before enrolling in this course.

    Required Tools:  Students must have their own instrument with the exception of the following: tuba, bassoon, oboe, baritone sax, bass clarinet. Percussionists should own a snare drum or drum set and a bell set or keyboard/piano. Students need to purchase the "Tuning CD" and a metronome (any type is OK). These are one-time purchases that can be used in successive years.

    This course is designed to further develop each student's playing technique, musicianship (theory, concepts, terms) and to employ these in creating artful performances. A wide variety of musical styles are performed each year. Students learn by playing in each rehearsal as well as class discussion and analysis via critical listening of musical passages during rehearsals. Students learn to assess their own playing, create and implement effective practice habits to refine their skills based upon the requirements of the music and work toward becoming independent and proficient musicians. This class is for musicians that enjoy the challenge of playing a wide range of music. This course is especially useful for any student wishing to pursue a career in music or that would like to build substantial musical skills that they can continue to enjoy in their post-school lives. The key qualities for students to be successful in this course are having enthusiasm, strong focus during rehearsals, consistent and effective practice habits and a desire to be a productive contributor to an ensemble that seeks musical excellence. All band students perform for several school concerts per year as well as have the opportunity to play in the Trinity Pep Band, which performs for numerous sporting events during the fall and winter sports seasons. Additional experiences such as participation in various ensembles (jazz ensemble, district, all-state honors bands) are available to interested students who meet the qualifying criteria. This class may be repeated for credit with teacher recommendation.

    Units of Study
    Individual Musicianship: Determining What the Music Tells You to Work Upon
    Effective Practice: Planning and Implementation
    Ensemble Musicianship: Critical Listening to the Music, Group and Your Roles
    Developing Artistry: Tone, Intonation, Articulation, Phrasing, Dynamic Shading
    Musical Independence and Leadership
    Popular Music Styles and Performances: 1st Semester
    Concert Band Music Styles and Performances: 2nd Semester
    Cabaret! Annual Theme Show (November or January)
    Holiday Concert (December)
    Spring Concert (March)
    Final Concert (May Fine Arts Festival)
     
  • Chorus - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit

    This elective course is designed to further develop each student's singing proficiency, enhance general musicianship (theory, concepts, terms) and grow as a more artistic performer. Students will have the opportunity to perform in several school concerts during the year. A variety of musical styles will be explored. Students learn through listening and responding, performing, singing in small groups and large ensembles, and performing mock-auditions.  Any student, regardless of previous experience, can be successful in this class by participating fully and being willing to learn new musical skills. Additional experiences such as participation in select ensembles (District and All-State Chorus) are available to interested students who meet the qualifying criteria. This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    General Musicianship
    Solfege
    Rhythms
    Music Theory
    Languages
    Performance and Practice Skills
    Cabaret! Theme Show
    Winter Fine Arts Festival
    Spring Concert
    Spring Fine Arts Festival
  • Preparatory Strings - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Required Tools:  Students must have their own instrument. Several area stores rent/sell string instruments.

    This elective course is designed for students with no experience with a stringed instrument as well as those students who have limited experience and need additional instruction to be prepared for the Orchestra class. This course will introduce the fundamentals of string playing and musicianship, including basic music theory, history and note reading.  Students learn through listening and responding, participating fully during class and with regular practice time outside of class. Additional experiences such as participation in select ensembles (District and Regional Orchestras) are available to interested students who meet the qualifying criteria. This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    General Musicianship Skills
    Ensemble Playing Skills
    Stringed Instrument Knowledge and Care
    Music Theory
    Tone Production and Intonation
    Cabaret! Theme Show
    Winter Fine Arts Festival
    Spring Concert
    Spring Fine Arts Festival
  • Orchestra - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  At least 2 years of playing experience in a supervised setting (school ensemble or private lessons)  
    Required Tools:  Students must have their own instrument. Several area stores rent/sell string instruments.

    This elective course is designed to further develop each student's playing proficiency, enhance their general musicianship (theory, concepts, terms) and become more artistic performers. Students will have the opportunity to perform in several school concerts during the year.  Students learn through listening and responding, participating fully during class and regularly practicing outside of class. A variety of musical styles will be explored. Additional experiences such as participation in select ensembles (Central Regional and Senior Regional Orchestra, All-State Orchestra) are available to interested students who meet the qualifying criteria. This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    General Musicianship
    Ensemble Playing Skills
    Practice Skills
    Performance Skills
    Music Theory
    Stringed Instrument Care and Maintenance
    Cabaret! Theme Show
    Winter Fine Arts Festival
    Spring Concert
    Spring Fine Arts Festival
  • Studio Music Production - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  Any other Trinity music course with at least a 'B' grade or passing score on Music Skills assessment

    This course investigates the musical (creating good song flow, solid bass lines and chord progressions, singable melody) and technical (proper recording levels, mic choices and placement, effects such as EQ and compression, creating engaging mixes) aspects currently used in creating popular music. Students learn by critical listening to sample professional and student projects, active discussion of the topics being explored, and then application of these principles within their own audio projects. The bulk of class time is spent working on the audio projects. Students will learn how to create songs that have solid musical construction and professional production values as well as analyzing these facets in works of artists that they listen to. This class is for student musicians that wish to improve their song-writing and production skills, particularly those that are considering a career in any musical media field. Students need to be inquisitive and open to listening to and drawing ideas from successful music in a variety of styles, not just those that are their favorites. Additionally, students taking this course need a solid sense of discipline to apply the principles that are learned and be able to remain on task when working independently. This class may be repeated for credit with instructor recommendation.

    Units of Study (Original Course)
    Studio Basics: Hardware and Software
    Song Structure 1: Bass and Drums
    Song Structure 2: Major/Minor Scales and Chord Progressions
    Melody Writing
    Microphones: Types and Placement Techniques
    Effects 1: EQ and Compression
    Effects 2: Reverb, Delay and Other Time-based Effects
    Creating Dynamic and Engaging Mixes
    Independent Projects

    Units of Study (Supplementary Topics if course is repeated)
    Mastering and Distribution
    'Cover' Projects
    Lyric Writing
    Horn and String Section Writing
    Independent Projects
    Stereo and Other Multiple Mic Techniques
    Video Game Scoring
    Jingle Writing
    Outboard Effects Processing
    TV and Film Scoring
    Creating an Audio Portfolio
  • Guitar 1 - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Required Tools:  Students will need a functional Acoustic guitar for class. Ideally, they will provide their own instrument but there are a limited quantity of school instruments that may be checked out to a student for the semester if necessary. All students will also need a 1.5" 3 ring binder, an electronic tuner (preferably the clip-on type), 6 or more picks, 2 sets of extra strings for their style of guitar, and a capo. If a student borrows a school instrument, they will need to acquire these other materials and bring them to class.

    Guitar 1 investigates the universal language of music and how to express it with six strings. Beginning with rudimentary skills, the class works towards a solid understanding of both the instrument and basic music fundamentals. Students will learn about the elements of melody, rhythm, and harmony through an extensive variety of popular songs and other exercises.  In class, students will learn through interactive lessons and activities while playing songs together in a fun group environment. Students are also expected to use supplemental resources posted to Google Classroom and instructor’s website to continue learning and effectively practice what is taught in class. This is not a performance based class but students will be required to perform together once in the semesterly Fine Arts Festival.

    This class is appropriate for both aspiring players with absolutely no experience as well as guitarists who have experience but lack a strong comprehension of fundamental music skills. (Enrollment in Guitar 2 is contingent upon either completing this class or demonstrating proficiency in the skills covered by interview with the instructor)   Preparation, participation, focus, and respect is important for learning in a group setting and out of class, a routine of effective practice is imperative for improving skills.
     
    Units of Study
    Understanding Music as a Universal Language
    Instrumental Voices and Why the Guitar is Awesome!
    Transitioning from Enjoying Music to Playing It…
    What You Need to Know about Your Guitar and How to Use It
    Understanding, Speaking, and Reading Pitch as a Guitarist.
    Melody, Riffs, and Phrasing Musical Ideas as Conversation
    The Process of Progress: Effectively Learning and Practicing
    Comprehending, Reading, and Applying Rhythm as a Guitarist
    Building Harmony and Chord Shapes in the “Open Position”
    Chord Progressions, following Song Structure, and Common Strum Patterns
    Playing Songs in Different Styles/Genres using Similar Groups of Chord Shapes as an Application of Skills
    The Capo, How To Use It, and Making Difficult Songs Easy
    Pick Patterns, Basic Finger-Style, and Additional Techniques
    Preparing for and Performing as an Ensemble (December/May Fine Arts Concert)
    Life after Guitar 1
  • Guitar 2 - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  Guitar 1 and/or teacher recommendation
    Required Tools:   Students will need a functional Acoustic Guitar, a 1.5" binder dedicated to the class, an electronic tuner, 2 extra sets of strings appropriate to their style of guitar, 6 or more picks, and a Capo.

    Guitar 2 is intended for competent intermediate and advancing guitarists with a functional understanding of the material covered in Guitar 1. Students will move beyond the open position and delve into bar chord shapes, extended chords, building major and minor scales, relationships between chords and key, arpeggios, lead technique, improvising, and other areas of fretboard knowledge. This is not a performance based class, but students will be required to perform together once in the semesterly Fine Arts Festival.
    Building on the fundamentals acquired in Guitar 1, this course continues to investigate understanding the diverse language of music and how it can be expressed with the instrument. Students will learn to build their vocabulary by unlocking the fretboard and delve into more advanced skills, styles, and techniques as well as music theory applied through a broad range of songs.  In class, students will learn through interactive lessons, lecture, activities and playing songs together in a fun group environment. Students are also expected to use supplemental resources posted to google classroom and instructor’s website to continue learning and effectively practice what is taught in class.

    This course is intended for competent intermediate and advancing guitarists with a functional understanding of the material covered in Guitar 1 and a desire to learn more. Enrollment is contingent upon either completing Guitar 1 this or demonstrating proficiency in the skills covered by interview with the instructor.

    Guitar 2 prepares students for a more informed pursuit of their musical interests and to take other departmental classes such as Guitar 3, Studio Music Production. It also puts students on track to take IB Music or CoLAB if they aspire to do so.  With increasingly complex material, the importance of engagement , focus during class and routine use of resources for effective out of class practice become even more imperative.

    Units of Study
    Leaving the Open Position with “Floating” Chord Shapes
    Unlocking the Fretboard and Playing Melodically Beyond the 5th Fret.
    Introduction to Major Scale Theory, Key Signatures, Intervals, and Building
    The Circle of 5ths and Why It is Useful
    Introduction to and Application of Basic “Closed” Barre Chord Shapes
    Extended Harmony, Evolving Chord Shapes, and Arpeggios
    Introduction to and Application of Major Pentatonic Scales
    Relative Minor Scales, Natural Minor Scales, and Building Harmony in minor Keys
    Introduction to and Application of Minor Pentatonic Scales
    Expression and Additional Techniques
    Introduction to Improvisation and Innovation
    Critical Listening Development
    Appreciation of the History and Evolution of the Guitar in Popular Music
    Preparing for and Performing as an Ensemble (December/May Fine Arts Concert)
    Life After Guitar 2
  • Guitar 3 - Grades 9-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisites:  Guitar 2 and Instructor Approval. This class may be repeated for credit with approval of Instructor as specific content taught varies each semester.
    Required Tools:  Students will need a functional Acoustic Guitar, a 1.5" binder dedicated to the class, an electronic tuner, 2 extra sets of strings appropriate to their style of guitar, 6 or more picks, a Capo, and a Guitar Strap.

    Continuing to grow from the knowledge, theory, and skills learned in previous courses, Guitar 3 moves towards exploration of instrumental communication on an advanced level through in-depth study of songs, playing styles, and influential musicians in the evolution of sonic culture. Specific songs and application of content rotates from year to year but students will continue to develop melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic skills, connecting chord and scale theory with playing techniques to build a stronger musical vocabulary.

    In class, students will learn through interactive lessons, lectures, and activities and by playing songs together in a fun group environment. Students are also expected to use supplemental resources posted to google classroom and instructor’s website to continue learning and effectively practice what is taught in class.  Guitar 3 prepares students for serious pursuit of musical interests beyond the classroom and opens the door for them to take either IB Music or CoLAB with approval from the instructor. Motivated learning, engagement and focus during class as well as routine use of resources for effective out of-class practice are crucial.

    Units of Study
    Review of Knowledge and Skills Expected to Be Known
    Recognizing Similarities and Differences Between Songs by Key
    Engaging I-IV-V Chord Progressions, Variations, and Riffs
    Songs by Notable Guitarists
    Stylistic Explorations
    Drop and Alternate Tunings, Partial Capo Techniques
    Improvising
    Fingerpicking
  • Collaborative Music Studies - Grades 11-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  Guitar 3 and/or demonstrates satisfactory proficiency with primary instrument to Head of Department.  Repeat enrollment in this class is possible at the discretion of Instructor.
    Required Tools:  Students are expected to provide their own primary instrument.

    CoLAB is about investigating the possibilities of what can be done with 12 notes, building confidence, practical skills and learning to navigate the experience of musical collaboration in a safe, structured, and supportive environment.  Student’s learn experientially by playing and exploring structured songs together, exercises designed to develop and apply practical skills, experimenting with instruments from the school’s collection, workshops and demonstrations by guest artists, using laptops in conjunction with studio resources to record and grow ideas, working towards the ultimate goal of performing together in a live setting.

    This class is appropriate for serious musicians who have achieved a strong level of technical proficiency on their instrument and are interested in developing practical collaborative skills working together with other musicians.

    Units of Study
    -What Are We Playing?: Jamming, Instigating Collaboration and Finding Common Ground in the Vast Potential of 12 Notes.
    The Art of Conversation: Leading, Following, and Dropping into Uncharted Musical Territory
    Getting it Together: Common Challenges and Pitfalls of Working with Musicians and How to Manage Them
    Bringing Songs to the Table, Building a Repertoire, and the Importance of Structure
    Improvising: Listening, Responding, and Learning to Take Risks with Confidence.
    Sonic Diversity and Developing Versatility from the Familiar
    Exploring the Un-familiar...Vocals and Other Instruments
    The Creative Cycle: Imitation, Inspiration, and Innovation
    Developing Ideas, Demos, and Studio Recording
    Gigging: Preparing, Rehearsing, and Doing it Live

Social Studies

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  • Faith in Film - Grades 10-12

    .5 Credit
    Faith in Film does not count toward the religion graduation requirement.

    Faith in Film is a systematic theology class intended to examine and discuss the major tenets of the Christian faith.  These doctrines will then be illustrated through various genres of film. Students will analyze these doctrines and attempt to reconcile them to their personal beliefs.  Students do not have to confess Christianity to take this course but should have some interest in developing a deeper knowledge of Christianity. Certain movies viewed in the course are intended for mature minds; students must have parental consent to take this class. Key skills include: critical thinking skills, primary source document skills, and film analysis skills.

    Units of Study
    Christian Anthropology
    Demonology
    The Problem of Evil
    Paterology
    Christology
    Pneumatology
    Ecclesiology
    Eschatology
  • Politics and Film - Grades 10-12

    .5 Credit

    Politics in Film explores popular political topics such as education, civil liberties, and laws affecting teenagers. Students will engage and discuss the content of each issue. Film will be used as an interpretation and springboard to full analysis of the topic. Through journals and discussions, students will develop an understanding of how film informs and influences the way Americans view political issues. Certain movies viewed in the course are intended for mature minds; students must have parental consent to take the class. Key skills include: critical thinking skills, primary source document skills, and film analysis skills.

    Units of Study
    Equal Opportunity Laws
    Education
    Abortion
    Laws Affecting Teenagers
    Healthcare
    Lobby Groups
    Civil Liberties
    Foreign Policy
    Gun Laws
    Immigration Laws
    War on Drugs

Religion

List of 4 items.

  • Old Testament - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Old Testament satisfies the religion graduation requirement.

    “In the beginning when God created...” These words written thousands of years ago continue to impact humanity. This class is an introduction to the rich history, stories, and beliefs preserved by the Jewish people. Primary content is devoted to historical movements, biblical characters, and various forms of text criticism. Secondary content includes how Old Testament themes connect to the New Testament. Key skills include: critical thinking skills, scope and sequence skills, periodization skills.

    Units of Study
    Biblical Prehistory
    Patriarchs and Matriarchs
    Theocracy
    Monarchy
    Prophets and Exiles
    Restoration
  • New Testament - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    New Testament satisfies the religion graduation requirement.

    This course begins with Jesus of Nazareth. Jesus asked the apostle Peter, "Who do you say that I am?" The students will thoroughly examine the Gospels and learn how each writer uniquely depicts the life of Jesus. Paul of Tarsus wrote to the Corinthians, "Three times was I beaten with rods and once received a stoning." This course will explore what motivated Paul to have an unprecedented desire to spread the Gospel throughout the Roman Empire. Primary content is devoted to historical movements, biblical characters, and various forms of text criticism. Secondary content includes how Old Testament themes connect with the New Testament. Key skills include: critical thinking skills, scope and sequence skills, periodization skills.

    Units of Study
    The Gospel of Matthew
    The Gospel of Mark
    The Gospel of Luke
    The Gospel of John
    Acts of the Apostles
    Epistles and Apocalypse
  • World Religion - Grades 9-12

    .5 Credit
    World Religions satisfies the religion graduation requirement.

    This course is designed as a comparative study of the world religions and begins by attempting to answer "Why Religion?" Students will examine numerous civilizations and how they are influenced by religion. Ample time will be spent on history, beliefs, and how the religions of the world impact humanity today. Key skills include: critical thinking skills, scope and sequence skills, periodization skills.

    Units of Study
    Origin of Religions
    Hinduism
    Buddhism
    Islam
    Judaism
    Christianity
  • Independent Study in Religion - Grade 12

     
    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite: Teacher permission

    Independent Study in Religion is available to seniors, who have already fulfilled Trinity's religion requirement and now desire a deeper exploration into religious studies. This journey allows students to revisit topics addressed in Old Testament, New Testament, or World Religions. The study also welcomes seniors, who are considering ministry opportunities in college or a potential career in such fields as missions, pastoral ministry, or Christian education.  This study may only be selected once as a semester elective.

    Units of Study
    Defining a Topic
    Delving Deeper Through Research and Inquiry
    Presentation

Technology

List of 5 items.

  • Discover Your Tech - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit

    Discover Your Tech is a survey course designed to introduce students to the technology available at Trinity. The course teaches basic computer skills as well as providing exposure to advanced tech opportunities. Students will learn how to utilize their school-assigned computer, program a computer game, program a robot, design and print a 3D object, code and develop an app, and create a digital movie. This is a project-based class and successful students will benefit from active engagement and participation.

    Units of Study
    Scratch and Block-based Programming
    Coding
    Game Design
    Robotics
    3D Printing
    App Development
    Design Thinking
    Videography
     
  • Information Technology Interns - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  Teacher permission

    This is a one-semester elective designed for the student with a strong interest in computers and information technology. Students are responsible for assisting technology department in installing hardware and software on the Trinity network. Troubleshooting, configuring and assembling computer systems are included.  Students learn through hands on activities guided by the technology department instructors.

    Units of Study
    Overall introduction to computers and networking concepts
    Current equipment and networks deployed at Trinity
    Methodology for troubleshooting and designing technology solutions
    Hands-On project work
  • Digital Videography 1 - Grades 9-12

    .5 Credit

    Digital Videography counts toward the Fine Arts graduation requirement.

    Digital Videography 1 introduces students to cinematography and video production through a theory-based, hands-on approach. Students will learn the history of media and media production and will be able to demonstrate competency in pre-production, production, and post-production. Students will apply problem-solving skills in planning, editing, and evaluating quality video productions. Topics include the fundamental technical aspects of the digital video camera, camera shots, angles, composition, media literacy, aesthetic elements and techniques, sound and lighting, scriptwriting, directing, and editing.

    Units of Study
    Directors
    Camera Shots and Angles
    Compositional Elements
    Camera Movements
    Editing Techniques
    Storyboarding
    Scriptwriting
    Sound Design
    Lighting
    Interviewing
    Directing
    Green Screen
  • Digital Videography 2 - Grades 9-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite:  Digital Videography 1 or teacher permission
    Additional Fee:  Optional purchase of Adobe Premiere Pro Creative Cloud ($20/month)

    Digital Videography 2 expands on what students have learned about cinematography and video production in Digital Videography 1 through a theory-based, hands-on approach. Students will learn about the history of media and media production and will be able to demonstrate competency in pre-production, production, and post-production to plan, create, and evaluate quality video productions and short films. Students will explore more of the technical aspects of the digital video camera, camera shots, angles, and composition, media literacy, aesthetic elements and techniques, sound and lighting, scriptwriting, directing, and editing.

    Units of Study
    Directors
    Camera Shots and Angles
    Compositional Elements
    Camera Movements
    Advanced Editing Techniques
    Storyboarding
    Scriptwriting
    Advanced Sound Design
    Advanced Lighting
    Character Development
    Directing
  • Programming Through Game Development - Grades 9-12

    .5 Credit

    This course is designed as an introductory course to both programming and game development. Students will be taught elements of successful game development through coding, modeling, game design, and digital citizenship. This is a project-based course and successful students will benefit from active engagement and participation.

    Units of Study
    Block-based Programming
    Coding
    Game Design
    Game Mechanics
    Programming Languages
    Robotics
    Drones
    Circuitry
    3D Modeling
    Unity

Theatre

List of 3 items.

  • Elements of Theatre - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Additional Fee:  Possible ticket fee if we attend performances
    Elements of Theatre is a semester course in which students are introduced to the art and craft of theatre making and theatre performance through participatory exercises and projects in mime, theatre games, improvisation, and rudimentary scene work as well as lecture/demonstrations on basic theatre terminology, direction, design and production. The course seeks to develop the student's knowledge and understanding of the many elements that comprise a theatrical production and to develop the ability to analyze and evaluate these elements as both participant and spectator. This work culminates with each student creating a Production Notebook of their own. In addition, student's develop creativity, collaborative skills and comfort in presenting and/or performing for others. Consistent, active engagement and participation in the exercises, scenes and projects and respect for peers are the key components for success in the course.

    Units of Study
    Tell Me a Story
    Talking Theatre
    Theatre Practice
    Putting It Together - Theatre Making
    Improv – Fake It Until You Make It?
    Your Mind's Eyes and Ears - Production Notebook
  • Technical Theatre - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit

    This course offers students the opportunity to learn and practice the fundamental methods and skills used to technically support a theatrical performance. The class combines lecture/demonstrations with applied, hands-on labs and projects. Students will learn the basic processes and materials used in theatrical scenery construction, lighting and sound with an emphasis on safety. Students will be instructed in, develop and demonstrate the skills required for the proper use and application of standard hand and power tools as well as a variety of common construction materials and techniques which are utilized by both theatrical technicians and DIYers. No prior skill or knowledge is needed - only an interest in basic construction and/or technical theatre and a willingness to be an active participant. This class may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    Telling Stories
    Safety First!
    Tech Talk
    Hammer Time! The Essential Basics
    What's' Up Doc? Telling the Technical Story Visually
    If You Build It....
    Lights Up!
    That Sounds Good!
    Knot Now!
  • Acting - Grades 10-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite: Elements of Theatre or instructor permission
    Additional Fee:  Possible ticket fee if we attend performances

    The Acting class is open to those students who have demonstrated a focused interest in performance. The course is designed for the dedicated student of acting and is based on a process/workshop approach. Through a combination of readings, research and scene work students will study and develop their acting technique. Specifically, students will develop their skills in script analysis, line memorization, character analysis and development, monologues and improvisation. Students are required to keep an actor's journal, participate in the performance projects and attend school productions as well as participate in post-performance critiques. A final project consisting of an in-class presentation and performance is required. Students are assessed on the honesty and consistency of their work ethic as well as their willingness to support and collaborate with their peers. "Talent" is not a factor in assessment.

    Units of Study
    To Be….or…Not….
    What a Character!
    Words, Words, Words and the Sound of Silence
    The Magic If
    Do You Hear What I Hear?
    Full of Sound and Fury…
    Go Ahead...Make a Scene

Science

List of 4 items.

  • Natural Hazards - Grades 8-9

    .5 Credit
    This course does not count toward the lab science graduation requirement.

    This course concerns natural hazards which are earth processes that have direct, and often sudden and violent impacts on human society. Three aspects of each natural hazard are investigated, their nature and effects , the science behind them, and methods to protect life and property from them. Students learn by class discussion, watching and analyzing videos, class projects, and participating in online simulations. Discussion of natural hazards happening in real time is emphasized, however major events in the past such as the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius and the 2004 Indonesian tsunami are also covered. A major project is the analysis of the movie Dante's Peak, one of the most scientifically accurate film depictions of a natural hazard. After taking this course students should be able to communicate to others what they learn about natural hazards, the warning signs of impending disasters, and what safety precautions to take. They should be able to write short answers to quiz questions with complete, accurate, and well-developed prose. Quiz questions are posted on Google Classroom prior to being given in class to help students develop this ability. This class is a one semester elective for eighth and ninth grade students who are interested in hazardous earth processes and how they impact the earth and the people who live on it. It is important for students in this class to be curious about the world around them, and willing to discuss and write about natural hazards. One of the best ways to prepare during this class is to discuss interesting things learned in class and current events with friends or family.

    Units of Study
    Wildfires
    Hurricanes
    Tornadoes
    Lightning
    Earthquakes
    Tsunamis
    Volcanoes
  • Astronomy - Grades 10-12

    .5 Credit
    This course does not count toward the lab science graduation requirement.

    This one semester descriptive astronomy course covers observing the sky, the origin of the solar system, planets and stars. Stellar astronomy emphasizes how we know the composition, properties, and life cycles of stars including how they end their lives as various stellar remnants. Planetary astronomy covers the age and origin of the solar system, and descriptions of the planets and their moons including the possibility of life. Students also learn about planets and stars by watching videos that illustrate them, and explain the scientific principles that govern them. Summaries of the main points are provided. Demonstrations and computer and pencil and paper activities serve as supplemental material. Anyone who is curious about the stars and planets may take this class. A knowledge of astronomy will help students understand all the discoveries that are happening now and in the future. Participation is key in this course.

    Units of Study
    The Solar System
    Observing the Sky
    Properties of Stars
    Life Cycle of Stars
    The Earth Moon System
    Terrestrial Planets
    Outer Planets
    The Sun
  • Sustainable Systems - Grades 10-12

    .5 Credit
    This course does not count toward the lab science graduation requirement.

    This semester long course explores the science behind the growing community concern for a sustainable way of life. What is a carbon footprint and why does it matter? What is an agricultural monoculture? Is organic food more nutritious than non-organic? How does land use impact the local environment and waterways? How are governments and businesses incorporating sustainability into their mission statements? How can I integrate these aspects of sustainability in my everyday life? Students in this course will cultivate answers to these questions and more by working in the Trinity garden, greenhouse, and tower garden, taking field trips to the river and listening to guest speakers who specialize in these areas. This course is primarily project based, where students learn and present on a variety of topics.. Learning through projects allows students to gain first-hand experience with a variety of technology tools and to use various forms of media to communicate what they are learning.  We work towards an ultimate goal of completely paperless learning and for students to learn strategies to minimize their impact on the globe. This course may be repeated for credit with instructor permission if space permits.

    It is recommended that students bring in a pair of rain boots or old shoes, as the class frequently works in the garden or does field studies.

    Units of Study (will vary by season)
    What Does It Mean to Live Sustainably?
    Garden Practices
    Sustainable and Non-sustainable Food Supplies
    Resources:  What is Renewable, Non-renewable or able to be Replenished?
    Cultural Aspects of Sustainability
  • The Science of Sport - Grades 11-12

    1 Credit
    Prerequisites: Conceptual Physics, Biology and Chemistry
    This course does not count toward the lab science graduation requirement.

    This course provides a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of sport. Fundamentals of biology, chemistry, physics and math are all investigated through the lens of sport, physical fitness and exercise. Students will explore nutrition, movement, statistics, anatomy and even psychology and ethics as they research sporting events, current events, exercise trends, and famous athletes throughout the world. Students in the course will read a non-fiction popular press book as part of the class, using the book to guide several weeks of discussion and analysis, and ultimately resulting in an extended research project/presentation inspired by the book.  The instructor will also incorporate a college level sports science textbook, online resources, various data collection tools including standard science labs, and regular discussion of current events in sports using a variety of media. Students who are interested in sports management, coaching and movement instruction, public health, and related health professions will benefit from the course.

    Units of Study
    Musculo-skeletal System
    Cardio-respiratory System
    The Power of Exercise in Society
    Psychology and Performance
    Movement Analysis/Biomechanics
    Learning and Teaching Sports Skills
    Ethics in Sport
    Book Review and Project

Visual Arts

List of 10 items.

  • Design Fundamentals - Grades 8-10

    .5 Credit
    This course is a requirement for IB Visual Arts.

    This academic art class explores the fundamentals of two and three-dimensional works of art. Classes consist of lecture, cooperative learning experiences, and reflection and responses to art, both historical and contemporary. Students will understand different mediums and techniques used to explore composition, expressive qualities, and intent of the artist. Formal critique writing skills evolve throughout the semester. The overall goal is for students to develop a visual vocabulary, theories, and concepts that can be applied to their own creative process. Throughout the class, students develop their own criteria for successful art. Design Fundamentals is a prerequisite for all IB Visual Arts classes.

    Units of Study
    Art in Our World
    The Elements of Art
    The Principles Of Art
    Art History

     
  • Elements of Drawing and Painting - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit

    This introductory semester course explores the theory, practice and history of painting and drawing from various cultures and periods. An examination of techniques from the traditional to the modern are combined with lectures and demonstrations concerning the use of materials and the basics of the visual language. The emphasis is on the student’s development in the elements of art, growth in self-expression, self-discipline, technical skill, critical thinking and creative problem solving. Students learn through means of demonstrations on focused techniques, introduction and exploration of processes, group and individual critique, oral and written reflection, sketchbooks, documentation in google classroom and display.

    Units of Study
    Drawing Through Various Methods and Materials
    Group Critique: Using the Elements of Art As A Language.
    Sketchbook: Exploring the Visual Elements Through Materials and Practice.
    Documenting and Uploading your work: Google classroom.
    Employing Visual Texture: Relief/Reductive Printmaking
    Compositional Watercolor Painting: Still Life
    Exploring Color and Creating Tones: Painting with Acrylics and Oils- Landscape
    Mounting a Show: Matt Cutting, and Prepping Finished Work.
    Mounting a Show: Creating Focus Statements
    Collaborative Display- Setting up, Arranging and Taking Down Work in a Large Group/Public Setting.
  • Advanced Drawing and Painting - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite: Elements of Drawing or teacher permission for transfer students

    This semester course will expand upon the media of drawing, painting and printmaking from the Elements of Drawing and Painting class. Further emphasis will be given to the importance of the use of Google slides in combination with sketchbooks in order to demonstrate critical thinking and develop their ability to convey emotive outcomes by the formal choices that they make. Students will alternate between instructor initiated projects and techniques in addition to taking greater responsibility for developing project ideas by combining their knowledge of materials with their own personal research. Regular class critiques will help students develop their understanding of the visual language and inform their artistic decision-making process. This course may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission. This course is required before the end of sophomore year in order to take IB Visual Arts HL.

    Units of Study
    Review Drawing Through Various Methods and Materials While Engaging Collaboratively
    Self-Guided Project #1- Google Slides: Research, Document, Synthesis of Resources
    Group Critique: Using the Elements of Art As A Language to Assess the Correlation Between Formal Choice and Emotive Outcome.
    Monotypes: Exploring Value With Subtractive Methods.
    Self-Guided Project #2
    Writing an Exhibition Text. Intent, Influence, Formal Choice and Emotive Outcome.
    Encaustic Painting: Still Life.
    SGP#3: Creating A Body of Work For A Show.
    Exploring Color and Creating Tones: Painting with Acrylics and Oils-
    Mounting and Matting A Show: Prepping Finished Work.
    Collaborative Display- Setting up, Arranging and Taking Down Work in a Large Group/Public Setting
  • Elements of Ceramics - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit
    Required Tools: 9x12 bound, blank page sketchbook

    This semester course provides an overview and introduction into the process and practice of ceramics. Students will explore ceramic techniques and processes while applying three-dimensional design concepts and terminology. The students will learn hand building and wheel thrown techniques as well as how to trim their pots. Students will also learn and experiment with a variety of surface treatments, glazes, and firing techniques. Emphasis is placed on skill development, studio practices, quality craftsmanship, experimentation, creative problem solving, and self-expression. At the end of the semester, students will participate in a show through which work will be featured on a website they will build and design themselves. These websites will include student photographs of their work, a video to represent their journey, style or technique, and an artist statement.

    Units of Study
    Handbuilding techniques: pinch pot, coil building, slabs.
    Wheel thrown techniques: cylinders, bowls, plates
    Discover Your Path to the Art Show
  • Ceramic Studio Workshop - Grades 9-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisites: Elements of Ceramics and teacher permission
    Required Tools: 9 x12 bound, blank page sketchbook

    This course follows Elements of Ceramics and is designed particularly for students who have an interest in ceramics but are not pursuing the IB path. New techniques will be built upon the skills learned in Elements of Ceramics, such as: handles, lids, combination pieces, shaping clay, throwing larger as well as alternate firing and glazing methods. Students will participate in an end of the semester art show and will showcase this show and their semester of growth on a website including photographs, a video and an artist statement. This class will require that students are prepared to push their skills to the next level and show a strong independent work ethic. Students are expected to make critical judgements of their work and challenge their creative process. Students must have a current (within the school year) recommendation to take the course. This course may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    Independent Handbuilding Project
    Independent Wheel Thrown project
    Teapot Project
    Discover Your Path to the Art Show
  • Advanced Ceramics - Grade 10

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisites: Design Fundamentals, Elements of Ceramics and teacher permission

    This course will address the three major areas of ceramics: understanding ceramic materials, hand-built and wheel-thrown pottery and surface resolution techniques. Approximately 75 percent of the students’ class time will be spent on the potter’s wheel. Emphasis is placed on developing independent skills,
    knowledge of process and materials and mastering the craft. Advanced Ceramics is for students committed to gaining independence, skill and knowledge in the field. Self-discipline and a willingness to seek new challenges are expected. Students continue to make critical judgements about their own art and the art of others. They are exposed to the historical and contemporary role of pottery from various cultures throughout
    the world.

    This class is designed for students who are pursuing the IB Visual Arts HL as diploma candidates or course candidates.

    Units of Study
    Review of Basic Forms
    Hans Coper, Architectural Sculpture
    Lidded Forms
    Surface Treatment
    Alternative Firing Processes
  • Sculpture - Grade 10

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite: Design Fundamentals, Elements of Ceramics and teacher permission

    This course covers the fundamental skills, knowledge, attitudes and technology necessary to begin to understand sculpture. Various sculptural processes are explored and students work with a variety of materials and tools. Students learn to make critical judgements about their own art and the art of others and are exposed to the historical and contemporary role of sculpture throughout the world. Students explore various materials such as clay, plaster, paper, wood, cardboard, wire and metal. Basic three-dimensional design will be considered with an emphasis on the elements and principles of design.

    Units of Study
    Carving Process
    Plaster
    Cultural Mask
    Found Objects
    Post Secret
  • Elements of Photography - Grades 8-12

    .5 Credit

    This studio course provides an overview and introduction into the fundamentals of photography as a fine art. Through demonstrations and practice, students learn the technical aspects of manual camera operation for proper exposures and the traditional black and white processes for developing film and printing in the darkroom. While exploring the expressive potential of the medium, students will engage with a variety of subject matter and learn compositional techniques to achieve engaging photographs. This course emphasizes technical proficiency and individual artistic expression. No prior experience is necessary to take this introductory level course. The camera and materials are provided for this course.

    Units of Study
    Camera Operation
    Developing 35mm Film
    Darkroom Operation and Creating Enlargements
    Projects
    Critiques
    Art Show
    Alternative Processes
    Artist Presentations
    Artist Websites
  • Advanced Digital Photography - Grade 9-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisite: Elements of Photography
    Required Tools:  Digital Camera with manual capabilities.  Both DSLRs and non DSLRs are acceptable. If the camera requirement presents an obstacle for enrolling in the class, accommodations may be available. Contact Mrs. Minehart for additional information.

    This course builds on skills learned in Elements of Photography while applying them to the digital photography platform. In addition to continuing camera skills proficiency, students will learn lighting techniques, color management, effective digital workflow in Adobe Bridge, and manipulation techniques utilizing Adobe Photoshop. Working to further refine their personal style and explore photography as a creative medium, students begin to develop a body of work based around their personal interests and artistic vision. This class is for students interested in continuing to pursue photography after Elements as well as students who want to learn digital image manipulation, a critical skill in a wide range of professions.

    Units of Study
    Digital Camera Operation and Digital File Management
    Lighting Workshop
    Adobe Photoshop
    Individual Semester Project
    Art Show
    Artist Presentations
    Artist Websites

     
  • Photography Studio Workshop - Grades 10-12

    .5 Credit
    Prerequisites:   Elements of Photography and teacher permission
    Required Tools:  In addition to using their cameras from Advanced Digital Photography, students will need a 35mm film camera. The cost to purchase one of these cameras is around $100. Options for film cameras will be discussed at the start of the class. If either of these camera requirements presents an obstacle for enrolling in the class, accommodations may be available. For additional information, speak to Mrs. Minehart.

    This course is designed particularly for students in 10th, 11th and 12th grade who have an interest in photography, but are not pursuing the IB path. This class will be highly independent with individualized instruction. There will be a thorough introduction to contemporary photographers via field trips, lectures and visiting artists. Students will incorporate both the analog and digital platforms as they continue to refine their technique and develop their ability to utilize photography as an expressive art medium. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with alternative processes throughout the semester. Students are expected to make critical judgements of their work, and others work, to challenge their own creative process and continue to strengthen their work ethic.  This course may be repeated for credit with the instructor’s permission.

    Units of Study
    Film Reintroduction
    Photoshop Reintroduction
    Mixed Media Experiments
    Concept Research
    Creative Planning
    Test Images
    Independent Project Work
    Working Critique
    Independent Project Completion
    Art Show Preparation
    Final Critiques
    Advanced Lighting and Lens Introduction

Non-Departmental Electives

List of 4 items.

  • AP Computer Science A (through Virtual Virginia)

    Grades 11-12

    As an upper level course in Computer Science, this course seeks to provide students with the opportunity to use critical thinking in developing solutions to problems through the use of Java language.  Students learn coding strategies, consider how to process data, and develop an awareness of the social and ethical aspects of computing. This course is analogous to a first semester university course in Computer Science and can help prepare students for study in technical, engineering, and science fields.  Success in this course requires students to be very self-motivated, persevere through challenges, and be self-directed.

    There are special circumstances associated with this course, so students wishing to take it must talk with the Associate Head of School.  
  • Life Essentials- Grades 10-12

    .5 Credit

    This semester-long elective is open to 10-12th graders and will focus on developing skills to be utilized both inside and outside of the classroom. It covers topics that are essential to success beyond high school. Areas covered include but are not limited to job search skills, resume and cover letter writing, interview skills, public speaking, basic etiquette, personal finance, goal-setting, personal safety, communication skills, marketing savvy, automotive maintenance, and laundry. The class will cover life skills outside of the academic curriculum that can serve students both in high school and throughout their lives.

    Students learn through a variety of lecture, class discussion, experiential learning, group projects, research, and presentations. The class uses Junior Achievement's Finance Park curriculum for the Personal Finance unit and visits the JA Finance Park at Libbie Mill Library for a day-long experiential field trip at the conclusion of the unit. The class is useful for older students as they prepare to live independently. Students must be enthusiastic participants with an interest in engaging with the class material.

    Units of Study
    Social Dynamics and Communications Styles
    Etiquette and Personal Safety
    Personal Finance
    The World of Work-Employment
    Consumer Savvy
    Insurance, Retirement, Taxes-What Fun!
    Heading Out on Your Own: Nuts, Bolts, and Automobiles
  • Sport and Society - Grades 10-12

    .5 Credit

    Whether you are an athlete, a sports fan, or both, you've come to the right course! Sports and Society will focus on the enormous impact sports has played--and continues to play--in society, with an emphasis on U.S. society. Students will explore issues of race, gender, economics and politics in relation to sports. Current topics in the news such as violence, safety, performance enhancing drug use, and whether college athletes should be paid, will be discussed and analyzed in a vibrant, respectful community of learners. Students will be expected to participate in a variety of activities including: weekly seminar discussions, research projects, and group activities. This class is designed to improve students’ critical thinking, discussion, research, and writing skills in preparation for college.

    Units of Study
    A Life in Sports
    Ethics in Sports
    Discrimination in Sports
    The Business of Sports
  • Psychology - Grade 12

    1 Credit

    This course is designed to give student a general idea of what psychology is, how information is developed, what we have learned about ourselves, and how psychology is applied to help improve people’s lives. Students learn through focused readings and class discussions as well as through interpreting scientific data and observations. Skills in critical analysis, observation, research, and writing are all emphasized. This course is a year long elective for senior students. This course is a solid foundation for students enrolling in a psychology 101 course in college. Students should be open-minded and curious about human behavior. Organized and independent learners will be successful in this class.

    Units of Study
    Psychology’s Roots, Big Ideas and Critical Thinking Tools
    Neuroscience and Consciousness
    Developing Through the Life Span
    Gender and Sexuality
    Sensation and Perception
    Learning
    Memory
    Thinking, Language and Intelligence
    Motivation and Emotion
    Stress, Health and Human Flourishing
    Personality
    Psychological Disorders
    Therapy
    Social Psychology